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Flagship Content Roundup

What is your Flagship Content? Last week I asked you to send in your examples of Flagship Content. I did this for three reasons

  1. To link out to your content (it’s always nice to reward readers)
  2. To see what you thought Flagship Content was
  3. To prompt readers who do not have any to create some!

I know from the contacts I have received there were quite a few of you who realised you don’t have any. This is a good thing providing you follow up that thought and get creating some! πŸ™‚

Obviously looking at this post I have achieved the first goal, there are a bunch of links here. Unfortunately though I couldn’t include everyone. Due to the number of links I was sent I had to trim down to a readable number plus I could only accept those that met the rules, eg. were sent using the form provided was a big one, another was that you linked to flagship content not your blog. I don’t have time to dig around your blog looking for something, interesting as that would have been. Other links I could not include were posted anonymously. I made the decision that I wanted to credit people and excluding anonymous contributions was also an effective method of filtering out the spam (of which I received a TON).

Many people had a hard time deciding what their flagship content was. What was submitted usually took the form of

  • Most popular
  • Authors favourite
  • Most representative

If you have content that ticks all three boxes then you are on to a winner. Even better is if your content gets positive word of mouth, which is after all half the point. A pleasant surprise was the number of people who had received brilliant opportunities from publishing their flagship content, that is probably the best validation of all.

I knew people might struggle to dig up their flagship content, even for people who had read the ebook. This is partly because “picking favourites” is hard, and partly because you were trying to choose from existing posts and had not written any content intending it to be flagship. My advice would be to read the ebook and create something new, something truly special, unique, remarkable and valuable. It is worth the effort and will double your rewards.

On with the links!

  • Pelf is a forum member who responded to a post by Lorelle to create her post

    she asked her readers to describe blogging.I wrote about the three most important things that “blogging” is to me — learning, improving and sharing. I also talked a little about how has blogging changed my life πŸ™‚

    While you will usually get better results with a completely original idea, you can always be inspired; other blogs and forum questions are rich mines of potential flagship content ideas.

  • how to sell a blog from Matt Jones demonstrates both a “How-to” and a series. Practical advice in series form is a winning flagship strategy, people link and bookmark, plus it keeps people reading. Darren does this routinely and it works very well for him. Once you have a good series you can even turn it into an ebook!
  • Scott submitted Starting your fitness journey and says “it was one of those rare ones that ‘just comes to you’. The article appeared almost as fast as I could type it.” – Something I am very familiar with (not the fitness part, man I wish!). If you have a topic that just flows out of you, run with it. If it is a chore then I think you have chosen the wrong subject to write about.
  • 20 programming lessons submitted by Jonathan Danylko and DazzlinDonnas free WordPress themes to modify and make your own show the strength of the numbered list, and also how you need to target a particular audience to be successful
  • With 3 Must Do Things For A New Blogger Ramkarthik has created curiosity in his headline. A good percentage of people will click through to see what those “must do” things are. Half the battle is creating a compelling headline.
  • Andrew Darlow submitted his taking better low light photographs. Tips work well to get one-off attention but it is mainly the longer tips lists that get bookmarked. Consider this, is your flagship content a snack or a meal?
  • With A Guide to Pipe Smoking Nathan Metzger shows that with blogging any topic has potential providing you have a passion for it πŸ™‚
  • With politics your flagship content has to stand for something specific, not a generic partisan support but something focused as in Brennan Kingslands contribution on “apathy among US parents to condition of public schools”.
  • 10 mistakes that will kill a forum was a reader favourite for SEO Refugee “In the first six months of the year, this article has accounted for 5% of all the traffic to our site (and that includes daily visitors to our forum).”
  • Ebooks work well for flagship content because they can be printed, emailed and shared. Vyoma submitted the PDF YOU too can sketch

    It is a sketching guide that lays down the basics of how to approach drawing and sketching. It explains that all can sketch and the established artists do not hold monopoly over the talent

    and Doug Smith submitted his ebook on home schooling

  • The long tail can be a good source of long term traffic. Matt Bradshaws Grave of Vampire review
    “keeps getting traffic, presumably because there are only a few reviews online for this relatively obscure movie”
  • Michael Martine outlines his Seven keys to better blogging as “the core approach I take to helping people become better bloggers”. Just like my ebook, your flagship content works best when it represents your blog and your philosophy, technique, approach or strategy.
  • David Culpepper seemed almost embarrassed to submit his post 3 ways to track your comments
    saying “I just threw it together rather quickly and wasn’t really happy with it but it has been very well received.” – proves if you write from authentic experience you don’t have to always put blood sweat and tears into something for it to be successful!
  • Do you believe in what you have written? Have you invested emotional capital? Rajesh says of his post What you need to become an entrepreneur

    “The concept of Emotional Capital is so critical to entrepreneurship, and yet I rarely see it discussed. Launching a new venture has got to be one of the most exhilarating experience in business. But like all things that matter, the entrepreneurial process has its ups and downs. Understanding the emotional aspect of this process is critical to success.”

    I think you can say the same about blogging, so it is a good example of both πŸ™‚

  • Surefire Ways To Get A Truck Load Of Comments On Your Blog Posts submitted by Jonathan Philllips shows that when you hit a topic that connects with your audience the links, comments and visits just flood in.
  • Eve submitted a comprehensive guide to telecommuting
    describing what telecommuting is, how to get into the industry, a list of companies, and more. If others are covering your topic one way to stand out is to go deep in one authoritative post.
  • Apparently streetwear is more than tee shirts by Kim Barrington does a good job of introducing her ideas and gives readers a taste of what they can expect from her blog.
  • Reviews work well if they can cover a wide range of options and provide real help, like this roundup of the Top 30 WordPress plugins by Staska. The only problem is the need to keep up with changes. My comprehensive blog software reviews over at Performancing still does well but is terribly out of date now.
  • Jan reminds us to blog with community in mind. It’s good advice, people talk about creating a community but you have to remember that community is your audience, your community is the people who you write your blog for.
  • How do you get attention from Digg, BoingBoing and 70k visitors (and counting)? With a Star Wars cake!

    The story directly appealed to a super-blog (BoingBoing), the story involved competition and mild controversy, and the content was unique and appealed to an ardent fanbase (namely, Star Wars fanboys)

    Take note …

  • When others zig, you should zag; How to make 4c a week by Rich Minx
  • If there is a parade, get in front of it as Fatgadget with a post about iPhones – earning 23,000 visitors in one day and a lot of links from other blogs
  • Everyone has experience to share. Joel wrote from experience and put together 7 Questions That Will Save Your Career. What advice could you give to somebody wanting to follow your own career?
  • Alexander Becker writes about “Peer pressure, vanity and behavior, motivation tricks and hacks, success and pain, and how to excel” in this ebook
  • It’s not always nice and fluffy stuff you need to write about, Kara-Leah submitted a post about dealing with suffering
  • Michael A. Stelzner submitted a post on Top 10 Blogs for writers. I nearly excluded it because it didn’t mention this blog but I will let him off as I guess I am featured as part of CopyBlogger πŸ˜‰
  • Galba Bright encourages us all to Tune up your EQ
  • Dave Child has had considerable success with his cheat sheets“I build the first cheat sheets because I needed them and decided to share them. By pure luck they proved popular. And now they are what my site is best known for (even though I personally think other content on there is better).”
  • 5 Tips for Content Distribution Networks by Lee Odden demonstrates a post that consistently builds ongoing links and traffic.
  • I remember seeing the post 12 Important U.S. Laws Every Blogger Needs to Know when it was published. It is a great resource. Submitted by Jeff Behrendt.
  • Kim Krause Berg doesn’t Digg Being Dugg – a sentiment I can well understand on occasion!
  • Flagship content creates leads, fact. How To Improve AdWords Quality Score

    This post was written on a whim. However it offered an answer to a popular question that had not been answered yet. I asked for nothing in return. This post demonstrated that our company knew what we were talking about.After the standard customer survey we found out that our two largest clients bringing in revenues of over two million a year found us and chose us because of this post

    by Dave Davis

  • Char Polanosky has provided a useful guide for bloggers – 13 Steps to a Blog Redesign
  • Sometimes your flagship content can coin a new phrase in your market as Jack did with network-managements-new-wave
  • Knowing your market really helps to launch content that will receive acceptance. Linda Martin helps home school parents find activities in Homeschooling Preschool Children: Twenty-Five Things To Do With Your Young Child.
  • David Krug has a talent for getting noticed, as evidenced by his intruigingly titled What Bill Clinton Knows About Web Publishing
  • It’s not just written content that works, Pete Wailes built a tool Woogle Wikipedia Search

Hope you like these links, sorry to anyone who didn’t make it this time!

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Comments

  1. Wow! So many links! All of them are probably great, too! I’ll have to bookmark this post for later reading.

  2. Wow! So many links! All of them are probably great, too! I’ll have to bookmark this post for later reading.

  3. Indeed a meta-resource, both answering WHAT is considered flagship content, and HOW it is approached and packaged. Thanks for the inclusion, Chris.

  4. Indeed a meta-resource, both answering WHAT is considered flagship content, and HOW it is approached and packaged. Thanks for the inclusion, Chris.

  5. I thought it was a great idea when I first read your article asking for entries, and this list confirms it.

    I’ll be reading through these for the next week. Nice job, Chris.

  6. I thought it was a great idea when I first read your article asking for entries, and this list confirms it.

    I’ll be reading through these for the next week. Nice job, Chris.

  7. How about making a badge for all the blogs mentioned:

    “Chris Garrett did by repeating my assertion that this blog has at least one flagship post sort of indirectly indicate that this blog may actually contain minimum one flagship post”

    When you do please let me know as I am sure my future visitors would appreciate knowing they are actually faced with the possible chance of engaging with supposed quality content of the superior kind (when they can spot the one post we are talking about that is) πŸ™‚

    Suddenly I realize I should have chosen Marketing as career after all… Oh, well…

  8. How about making a badge for all the blogs mentioned:

    “Chris Garrett did by repeating my assertion that this blog has at least one flagship post sort of indirectly indicate that this blog may actually contain minimum one flagship post”

    When you do please let me know as I am sure my future visitors would appreciate knowing they are actually faced with the possible chance of engaging with supposed quality content of the superior kind (when they can spot the one post we are talking about that is) πŸ™‚

    Suddenly I realize I should have chosen Marketing as career after all… Oh, well…

  9. I found it fascinating and fun to read Joel’s answers to 7 Questions That Will Save Your Career, especially the ones about keeping his students engaged and interested. Those answers totally apply to blogging and really, any business! Treat the word “students” as “clients,” “customers,” or “readers.” Great job, Joel!

    Michael Martine’s Better Blogging article is great! I can see how it is good for both him and his readers; he lays down what his blog will be about and that probably does wonders for his direction and motivation for writing. He just got at least one new subscriber today πŸ™‚

    Galba Bright’s EQ articles were brilliant! I like how he didn’t try to cover everything in one long, exhaustive post. It gives readers and awesome introduction to his blog without being overwhelming.

    Thanks for doing this, Chris. It’s great for you (to show how people have implemented your advice) and for them (they get links and generate traffic). What a perfect combination!

  10. I found it fascinating and fun to read Joel’s answers to 7 Questions That Will Save Your Career, especially the ones about keeping his students engaged and interested. Those answers totally apply to blogging and really, any business! Treat the word “students” as “clients,” “customers,” or “readers.” Great job, Joel!

    Michael Martine’s Better Blogging article is great! I can see how it is good for both him and his readers; he lays down what his blog will be about and that probably does wonders for his direction and motivation for writing. He just got at least one new subscriber today πŸ™‚

    Galba Bright’s EQ articles were brilliant! I like how he didn’t try to cover everything in one long, exhaustive post. It gives readers and awesome introduction to his blog without being overwhelming.

    Thanks for doing this, Chris. It’s great for you (to show how people have implemented your advice) and for them (they get links and generate traffic). What a perfect combination!

  11. Hey great list Chris, and thanx a lot for the linkage and mention. Will probably take me some time to read all the entries, but I have a feeling it’s gonna be worth it πŸ™‚

  12. Hey great list Chris, and thanx a lot for the linkage and mention. Will probably take me some time to read all the entries, but I have a feeling it’s gonna be worth it πŸ™‚

  13. How the blazes did I miss this one?

    Eyes wide open from now on! …sorry to anyone who didn’t make it this time! The “this time” offers a seed of hope.

  14. How the blazes did I miss this one?

    Eyes wide open from now on! …sorry to anyone who didn’t make it this time! The “this time” offers a seed of hope.

  15. @Adam – Please do bookmark it, and get your friends to also πŸ˜‰

    @Alexander – thanks for your submission πŸ™‚

    @David – It took me a while to read all of them, better make a coffee πŸ™‚

    @Jan – A badge is a nice idea but not sure how many people have a 2000px wide sidebar πŸ˜‰

    @LaurenMarie – Good point!

    Michael – I always like win-wins πŸ™‚

    @Jon – You might not get through all of them but I am sure there are a good few you will want to bookmark and dip into

    @Rory – There will indeed be more coming, if only to test the new version of Damians plugin! I just have to think of a topic …

  16. @Adam – Please do bookmark it, and get your friends to also πŸ˜‰

    @Alexander – thanks for your submission πŸ™‚

    @David – It took me a while to read all of them, better make a coffee πŸ™‚

    @Jan – A badge is a nice idea but not sure how many people have a 2000px wide sidebar πŸ˜‰

    @LaurenMarie – Good point!

    Michael – I always like win-wins πŸ™‚

    @Jon – You might not get through all of them but I am sure there are a good few you will want to bookmark and dip into

    @Rory – There will indeed be more coming, if only to test the new version of Damians plugin! I just have to think of a topic …

  17. Hello Chris:

    I’ve had a great time reading most of the flagship content. This is a great idea and an excellent learning experience. Thanks so much for the link and the mention.

  18. Hello Chris:

    I’ve had a great time reading most of the flagship content. This is a great idea and an excellent learning experience. Thanks so much for the link and the mention.

  19. Thanks for all this, Chris; I’ve bookmarked it and will link back in a speedlink post soon πŸ™‚

  20. Thanks for all this, Chris; I’ve bookmarked it and will link back in a speedlink post soon πŸ™‚

  21. Chris, thanks so much for the mention. And, the homework assignment to begin with. It really made me think about what I was offering my “audience” and whether I was doing this consistently. I love your blog and of course downloaded the white paper. I’ve read it alongside David Meerman Scott’s “New Rules of Marketing and PR.” A few days ago Ad Age Daily mentioned that all Marketing Managers need to immerse themselves in the online world to figure out what is going on. Apparently most don’t. It’s good advice cause there is a whole world in here. Thanks again! I’ll StumbleUpon this one.

  22. Chris, thanks so much for the mention. And, the homework assignment to begin with. It really made me think about what I was offering my “audience” and whether I was doing this consistently. I love your blog and of course downloaded the white paper. I’ve read it alongside David Meerman Scott’s “New Rules of Marketing and PR.” A few days ago Ad Age Daily mentioned that all Marketing Managers need to immerse themselves in the online world to figure out what is going on. Apparently most don’t. It’s good advice cause there is a whole world in here. Thanks again! I’ll StumbleUpon this one.