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The Productivity Secret of Positivity and Gratitude

Lately I have been finding inspiration in some unusual places. One thought that has stuck in my head was inspired by Stephen Hopson and his Gratitude Theme

Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos to order, confusion to clarity. It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend. Gratitude makes sense of our past, brings peace for today and creates a vision for tomorrow.

We all like to moan occasionally. Sometimes with good reason, sometimes not so much. Have you noticed though what happens when you get into that pattern?

I know people who seem to be on the negative all the time. They seem to take pleasure out of seeing the dark side. They fuel this habit with newspapers and television shows that are all about anger, gloom and doom. Each new article gets them all heated up with righteous indignation and political fervor. Tell them what is going on in your life and they will tell you why and how it will all turn downhill.

Unsurprisingly these people rarely achieve much, and when they do they can’t enjoy it.

Now think about people like Stephen. He made history in 2006 as the worlds first deaf instrument-rated pilot in the world. This was after being a mover and shaker in Wall Street by the way. Just let that sink in for a moment.

You can get the full story here.

Gratitude is inspiring

If you focus with gratitude on the things you have achieved and want more of, I believe you will be more motivated and better equipped. Think of the times people have said

  • “I only have 100 subscribers, I deserve more” rather than “thank you to my 100 subscribers”
  • “He/She doesn’t deserve that Digg front page, they must be gaming the system” rather than “I am grateful for the people who visit me”
  • “This will never work for me, I don’t have so-and-so’s advantages” rather than “Other people have achieved X despite harsher disadvantages, if they can do it, so can I!”

Negative thinking drags you down, gets your brain inventing reasons why you can’t, won’t, shouldn’t. It saps your energy and makes you a pain to be around. On the other hand positivity and gratitude energize, motivate, get your brain in a creative mode and attract people to work with you. Which could you use more of?

What you focus on you get more of

When you meet Stephen you get an enormous feeling of positivity right away. He smiles, he is upbeat, and broadcasts this energy. Quite the opposite of those toxic people mentioned above who seem on a permanent downer.

I do believe that like attracts like and what you focus on you get more of. This principal holds true no matter if you think of this in a mystical way or just look at your own practical experience of life. Our moods, outlook and attitudes get reflected back and amplified. What we put out comes back.

You can test it yourself, force yourself to smile more and see how people react to you (don’t over do it out of context, people will think you are insane, heh).

Have you noticed when you get a new car all of a sudden the roads seem full of them? We tend to associate with similar people, tend to level out in all sorts of ways, to become the average of who we spend time around.

So, what is the answer?

If we

  • consciously adjust our own behavior,
  • focus on the positive and on gratitude,
  • keep our attitudes in check,
  • stop constantly worrying about worst-case-scenarios,
  • and aim to be with the positive and encouraging people

… I believe our productivity will improve.

What do you think? Does this make sense to you? Think I have lost the plot? Please share in the comments …

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Comments

  1. Jamie Harrop says:

    I couldn’t agree more, Chris.

    I know people who have set out to rid themselves of anybody in their life who is negative. They put up with them for many years, but eventually that negativity had an impact on them. The only way to get out dsfef of the negativity trap was to avoid those people who are negative.

    Fantastic post, Chris.

  2. I couldn’t agree more, Chris.

    I know people who have set out to rid themselves of anybody in their life who is negative. They put up with them for many years, but eventually that negativity had an impact on them. The only way to get out dsfef of the negativity trap was to avoid those people who are negative.

    Fantastic post, Chris.

  3. It’s a hard thing to do, and it might not be necessary to completely stay away from negative people (especially if they are family), but I think having a “negativity fast” is essential to maintain sound mind and progress.

  4. It’s a hard thing to do, and it might not be necessary to completely stay away from negative people (especially if they are family), but I think having a “negativity fast” is essential to maintain sound mind and progress.

  5. Chris:

    What a generous, awesome plug! I’m flabbergasted and grateful (of course) for this spread. Thank you Chris. I hope your readers will seriously think about the power of gratitude and how all it takes is a quick change of attitude about something to make things right again.

    That’s how much power we have. I’m so grateful for everything that’s happened in my life, even the difficult situations I put myself into because I learned some lessons (albeit tough ones but lessons nevertheless).

    Thanks for sharing my story with the rest of the world. Hey, I am reading your Problogger book these days. I’m up to page 129, more than halfway done. Awesome stuff in there. You guys did a very, very nice job. I’ve highlighted the heck out of it and made a lot of notes like “Hmmm, this is what I’ve been doing!” or “Need to do more of this.” or “Got to stop doing this and try that instead.”

    πŸ™‚

  6. Chris:

    What a generous, awesome plug! I’m flabbergasted and grateful (of course) for this spread. Thank you Chris. I hope your readers will seriously think about the power of gratitude and how all it takes is a quick change of attitude about something to make things right again.

    That’s how much power we have. I’m so grateful for everything that’s happened in my life, even the difficult situations I put myself into because I learned some lessons (albeit tough ones but lessons nevertheless).

    Thanks for sharing my story with the rest of the world. Hey, I am reading your Problogger book these days. I’m up to page 129, more than halfway done. Awesome stuff in there. You guys did a very, very nice job. I’ve highlighted the heck out of it and made a lot of notes like “Hmmm, this is what I’ve been doing!” or “Need to do more of this.” or “Got to stop doing this and try that instead.”

    πŸ™‚

  7. Chris,

    I agree! Stephen is inspiring and I have nicknamed him “my morning person full of optimism and sunshine”.

    I look forward to his morning tweets as they help me focus on the positive in my life. I start my day so much better because of him and others. I hope they realize they make a difference!

    Great article.

    Vicky H

  8. Chris,

    I agree! Stephen is inspiring and I have nicknamed him “my morning person full of optimism and sunshine”.

    I look forward to his morning tweets as they help me focus on the positive in my life. I start my day so much better because of him and others. I hope they realize they make a difference!

    Great article.

    Vicky H

  9. @Stephen – Thank YOU for, well, doing what you do πŸ™‚ I think your story is an inspiration and more people should know about it

    @Vicky – Totally true and a great tip, I should do the same and start the day the same way πŸ™‚ You know you are a positive influence too, right? πŸ™‚

  10. @Stephen – Thank YOU for, well, doing what you do πŸ™‚ I think your story is an inspiration and more people should know about it

    @Vicky – Totally true and a great tip, I should do the same and start the day the same way πŸ™‚ You know you are a positive influence too, right? πŸ™‚

  11. When I was younger gratitude was part of my nature. Through my adult years it slowly slipped away as life lessons came along. This continued until I began working with folks with developmental disabilities. Watching someone in a work training environment pushing with everything they have to learn the skills needed in community employment changed my perspective on life.

    As a matter of fact in the 6 years with the Beaufort County Developmental Center, the nonprofit I work with, I can’t remember someone sitting around felling sorry for themselves.

  12. When I was younger gratitude was part of my nature. Through my adult years it slowly slipped away as life lessons came along. This continued until I began working with folks with developmental disabilities. Watching someone in a work training environment pushing with everything they have to learn the skills needed in community employment changed my perspective on life.

    As a matter of fact in the 6 years with the Beaufort County Developmental Center, the nonprofit I work with, I can’t remember someone sitting around felling sorry for themselves.

  13. Robert, it really puts things in perspective doesn’t it? My mum worked in a similar capacity and told me the same thing.

  14. Robert, it really puts things in perspective doesn’t it? My mum worked in a similar capacity and told me the same thing.

  15. Chris:

    How do the heck I get my photo up on there in the comment section? I belong to MyBlogLine but that doesn’t seem to be helping.

    Anyway, I wanted to respond to Robert’s comment – you’ve nailed it on the head about “perspective.” It’s all about how we perceive things happening to us, not the actual event themselves. And then what we do about it.

    With this simple change of attitude, we can instantly shift from a victim mentality to one of strength. For instance, when I was a kid, I used to feel sorry for myself b/c who wants to be deaf, right?

    Then I met people in wheelchairs, blind people, etc. Whoa. That completely shifted my self-perception. Then I realized I was given a mission to carry out, which is why I was born deaf. That made things even more compelling. Once we feel like we have a life purpose, then it doesn’t matter what our “limitations” are.

  16. Chris:

    How do the heck I get my photo up on there in the comment section? I belong to MyBlogLine but that doesn’t seem to be helping.

    Anyway, I wanted to respond to Robert’s comment – you’ve nailed it on the head about “perspective.” It’s all about how we perceive things happening to us, not the actual event themselves. And then what we do about it.

    With this simple change of attitude, we can instantly shift from a victim mentality to one of strength. For instance, when I was a kid, I used to feel sorry for myself b/c who wants to be deaf, right?

    Then I met people in wheelchairs, blind people, etc. Whoa. That completely shifted my self-perception. Then I realized I was given a mission to carry out, which is why I was born deaf. That made things even more compelling. Once we feel like we have a life purpose, then it doesn’t matter what our “limitations” are.

  17. Stephen, above the comment form there is a link that explains Gravatars, should tell you what you need to know to get your own picture πŸ™‚

  18. Stephen, above the comment form there is a link that explains Gravatars, should tell you what you need to know to get your own picture πŸ™‚

  19. Chris:

    Wow, I just added my gravatar for the FIRST time. Thanks for leading me to that link about getting one. I didn’t see it.

    Now let me try again.

  20. Chris:

    Wow, I just added my gravatar for the FIRST time. Thanks for leading me to that link about getting one. I didn’t see it.

    Now let me try again.

  21. Darn, darn, darn, it didn’t show up! I’ll have to go back to Gravatar and see what’s up – maybe it needs time to “percolate”?

  22. Did you use the same email address you comment with? Maybe it takes a moment to work ..

  23. Darn, darn, darn, it didn’t show up! I’ll have to go back to Gravatar and see what’s up – maybe it needs time to “percolate”?

  24. Did you use the same email address you comment with? Maybe it takes a moment to work ..

  25. Yep, there it goes! It worked. Hooray. πŸ™‚ Thanks.

  26. Yep, there it goes! It worked. Hooray. πŸ™‚ Thanks.

  27. I’ve just been commenting elsewhere about the importance of humour in work and business, and I do think that a positive attitude is no less important. There is definitely a victim culture that seems worse these days. You only have to sit in a train for five minutes to hear four and a half minutes of moaning. I also think that being pragmatic is an important part of this. When (not if) things go wrong, it may be important to establish why, and even to apportion blame, but the most important thing has to be to say OK we are here now, what can we do in the next five minutes/hours/days/months that will make things greater.

  28. I’ve just been commenting elsewhere about the importance of humour in work and business, and I do think that a positive attitude is no less important. There is definitely a victim culture that seems worse these days. You only have to sit in a train for five minutes to hear four and a half minutes of moaning. I also think that being pragmatic is an important part of this. When (not if) things go wrong, it may be important to establish why, and even to apportion blame, but the most important thing has to be to say OK we are here now, what can we do in the next five minutes/hours/days/months that will make things greater.

  29. Hi Chris, no you’re not nuts – gratitude is a great place to work, write and live from. And yes, Stephen is bursting with positive energy – it was a treat meeting him at SobCon.

    Joanna

  30. Hi Chris, no you’re not nuts – gratitude is a great place to work, write and live from. And yes, Stephen is bursting with positive energy – it was a treat meeting him at SobCon.

    Joanna

  31. Chris

    I am a 100% believer in positive thinking and the law of attraction. I write a monthly magazine article entitled “positively speaking”. Even my blog wakeupbreathing.com is about living a positive life.

    There is so much people can accomplish by just turning away from the negative. But this isn’t always easy when you have trained your mind over years to be negative. You actually have to retrain yourself. But one of the first steps is being grateful for what you have and being aware of when you go negative and correct yourself.

    Great article to get people thinking about their view of life.

  32. Chris

    I am a 100% believer in positive thinking and the law of attraction. I write a monthly magazine article entitled “positively speaking”. Even my blog wakeupbreathing.com is about living a positive life.

    There is so much people can accomplish by just turning away from the negative. But this isn’t always easy when you have trained your mind over years to be negative. You actually have to retrain yourself. But one of the first steps is being grateful for what you have and being aware of when you go negative and correct yourself.

    Great article to get people thinking about their view of life.

  33. It’s a good post Chris and something I’ve been thinking about a lot myself of late. A bit like Steve Jobs, negative people upset me. And much like most things that bother us as people, it’s because I see the things they do in myself.

    Having come to this realisation, I’ve made a conscious effort to separate myself from those areas where I felt I was more prone to acting in a negative way, or was surrounded by people who were having a negative influence on me. You can’t get away from everything – and to be honest I’m not sure that running away complete is ever the answer, or is even possible – but you can, to some extent, control your surroundings.

    What I’d also add is that if you find yourself going out of your way to HAVE to be positive with a given person because they’re always negative, you need to really think about what that person is doing in your life. If it’s a relative or loved one it’s one thing, and you should take steps to find out what is going on with them. If it’s a casual friend or business colleague – or worse, boss – then you really need to think about setting boundaries.

    So, I concur. All about one thing: NOBODY gets on to the front page of Digg without in some way working the system! πŸ˜‰

  34. It’s a good post Chris and something I’ve been thinking about a lot myself of late. A bit like Steve Jobs, negative people upset me. And much like most things that bother us as people, it’s because I see the things they do in myself.

    Having come to this realisation, I’ve made a conscious effort to separate myself from those areas where I felt I was more prone to acting in a negative way, or was surrounded by people who were having a negative influence on me. You can’t get away from everything – and to be honest I’m not sure that running away complete is ever the answer, or is even possible – but you can, to some extent, control your surroundings.

    What I’d also add is that if you find yourself going out of your way to HAVE to be positive with a given person because they’re always negative, you need to really think about what that person is doing in your life. If it’s a relative or loved one it’s one thing, and you should take steps to find out what is going on with them. If it’s a casual friend or business colleague – or worse, boss – then you really need to think about setting boundaries.

    So, I concur. All about one thing: NOBODY gets on to the front page of Digg without in some way working the system! πŸ˜‰

  35. Chris

    thanks for this article. I think it’s one them them which I should put up on the wall somewhere, just to see it everytime I run the danger of negative thinking. The traffic on my blog is really not so big, but thanks for every visitor who takes the time and goes there. Be grateful for what you have – you say it Steve!

  36. Chris

    thanks for this article. I think it’s one them them which I should put up on the wall somewhere, just to see it everytime I run the danger of negative thinking. The traffic on my blog is really not so big, but thanks for every visitor who takes the time and goes there. Be grateful for what you have – you say it Steve!

  37. Chris
    A very useful article that should help many people to really get value from what they are doing day to day. You describe very well the technique of ‘reframing’ which is a process of looking at an issue from a number of different perspectives. The perspective could range from a ‘best case scenario’ to the ‘worst case scenario’ as an effective means of getting a clearer picture of what is in fact the ‘reality’ of the issue. One of the benefits from ‘reframing’ is that it forces a person to look beyond the obvious to take into account other factors including ones that appear to be out of ‘left fiels’ and from the thinking often it generates two or three very plausable options.
    Tomaso

  38. Chris
    A very useful article that should help many people to really get value from what they are doing day to day. You describe very well the technique of ‘reframing’ which is a process of looking at an issue from a number of different perspectives. The perspective could range from a ‘best case scenario’ to the ‘worst case scenario’ as an effective means of getting a clearer picture of what is in fact the ‘reality’ of the issue. One of the benefits from ‘reframing’ is that it forces a person to look beyond the obvious to take into account other factors including ones that appear to be out of ‘left fiels’ and from the thinking often it generates two or three very plausable options.
    Tomaso

  39. I don’t know about the rest of you guys, but for me, the key point was (cut & paste from the end of the article)

    **
    So, what is the answer?

    If we

    * consciously adjust our own behavior

    **

    I have to ‘conciously’ do this everyday. Of course each day it becomes more natural, but I still have to remind myself.

    Does being optomistic come naturally to you?

    Vicky H

  40. I don’t know about the rest of you guys, but for me, the key point was (cut & paste from the end of the article)

    **
    So, what is the answer?

    If we

    * consciously adjust our own behavior

    **

    I have to ‘conciously’ do this everyday. Of course each day it becomes more natural, but I still have to remind myself.

    Does being optomistic come naturally to you?

    Vicky H

  41. Thanks for writing about this, Chris! It’s frighteningly easy to fall into the time & energy suck of negativity. It’s very hard to get anything positive done when you’re dragging a lot of heavy negative baggage around.

  42. Thanks for writing about this, Chris! It’s frighteningly easy to fall into the time & energy suck of negativity. It’s very hard to get anything positive done when you’re dragging a lot of heavy negative baggage around.

  43. I agree with Stephen that it’s our response to our circumstances that makes the difference between victimization and power.

    I believe in gratitude because I believe that everything we have comes through either the efforts of someone else or by the grace of some power in the Universe. However, I have a problem with the popular idea that we should be grateful because it will result in more good things for us.

    That may very well be true, but as the song says, “It ain’t necessarily so.” I have looked back over the past 15 years or so of my own life, and I’ve seen times of plenty, and times of struggle; times of humor and times of sadness; I’ve seen miracles and tragedies. Through it all, I can see that my attitude colors the way I FEEL about my circumstances, but what I haven’t seen is any real evidence in my own life that my attitude CAUSES my circumstances. Life is much more mysterious and complicated than that.

    Likewise, I’ve also witnessed many cranky, negative people who have accomplished much as well as some very positive, loving people who always seem to be getting the short end of the stick.

    I have come to my own conclusion that it is good and right to be grateful because I have been blessed – in whatever ways. I find that if I slip into the kind of thinking that says I will get more blessings if I am grateful for what I have, I am reducing gratitude to a tool to be used instead of as a sacred response to life.

    Peace,
    Julie

  44. I agree with Stephen that it’s our response to our circumstances that makes the difference between victimization and power.

    I believe in gratitude because I believe that everything we have comes through either the efforts of someone else or by the grace of some power in the Universe. However, I have a problem with the popular idea that we should be grateful because it will result in more good things for us.

    That may very well be true, but as the song says, “It ain’t necessarily so.” I have looked back over the past 15 years or so of my own life, and I’ve seen times of plenty, and times of struggle; times of humor and times of sadness; I’ve seen miracles and tragedies. Through it all, I can see that my attitude colors the way I FEEL about my circumstances, but what I haven’t seen is any real evidence in my own life that my attitude CAUSES my circumstances. Life is much more mysterious and complicated than that.

    Likewise, I’ve also witnessed many cranky, negative people who have accomplished much as well as some very positive, loving people who always seem to be getting the short end of the stick.

    I have come to my own conclusion that it is good and right to be grateful because I have been blessed – in whatever ways. I find that if I slip into the kind of thinking that says I will get more blessings if I am grateful for what I have, I am reducing gratitude to a tool to be used instead of as a sacred response to life.

    Peace,
    Julie

  45. Nope, I don’t think you’ve lost the plot at all. It’s extremely important to be grateful and sometimes too easy to forget.

    I used to go to AA and it was always stressed to to put the “attitude of gratitude” front and center. After years of putting the depressant called alcohol in my body, negativity had become a way of life. I am (dare I say) so grateful that I was able to train myself to think differently.

    Reminders are always appreciated.

  46. Nope, I don’t think you’ve lost the plot at all. It’s extremely important to be grateful and sometimes too easy to forget.

    I used to go to AA and it was always stressed to to put the “attitude of gratitude” front and center. After years of putting the depressant called alcohol in my body, negativity had become a way of life. I am (dare I say) so grateful that I was able to train myself to think differently.

    Reminders are always appreciated.

  47. Pardon me, this is just a Gravatar test.

  48. Pardon me, this is just a Gravatar test.

  49. Great post and comments. Stephen is one of my favorite bloggers because he does walk his talk. He has overcome obstacles to become who he is and is an inspiration to others.

    I agree with Julie that we shouldn’t be grateful just because of what it will bring us. That isn’t true gratitude. Being grateful for what life brings us doesn’t need attachments added to it. I will do this if I get this is the wrong way to look at giving. Gratitude comes from the heart, not the mind. Attachments come from the ego.

  50. Great post and comments. Stephen is one of my favorite bloggers because he does walk his talk. He has overcome obstacles to become who he is and is an inspiration to others.

    I agree with Julie that we shouldn’t be grateful just because of what it will bring us. That isn’t true gratitude. Being grateful for what life brings us doesn’t need attachments added to it. I will do this if I get this is the wrong way to look at giving. Gratitude comes from the heart, not the mind. Attachments come from the ego.

  51. Great post, I just did a post related to gratitude today. It is better to be grateful for the things you have then the things you will get. While it is often hard to always see the bright side of things, we all must find the silver lining and keep our faith or our lives will surely fail. I always like to believe “God does not challenge us with more than we can handle.”

  52. Great post, I just did a post related to gratitude today. It is better to be grateful for the things you have then the things you will get. While it is often hard to always see the bright side of things, we all must find the silver lining and keep our faith or our lives will surely fail. I always like to believe “God does not challenge us with more than we can handle.”

  53. Chris, thank you for the reminder! Like you, I have been finding inspiration in many places… your blog being one of them! The message of gratitude has been consistent… and powerful.

    On Thanksgiving 2006, I gave out “gratitude rocks” (ala The Secret) as place settings. I told the story of putting it in a pocket and saying thank you for something whenever you felt it. I just talked to my husband’s grandmother last week and she said, “You know that rock you gave me? Every morning I take it from my nightstand and say thank you as I put it in my purse. And at night when I take it out again, I say thank you.”

    It was a little reminder TO ME about how a subtle shift in mindset can… change your life!

    Ria

  54. Chris, thank you for the reminder! Like you, I have been finding inspiration in many places… your blog being one of them! The message of gratitude has been consistent… and powerful.

    On Thanksgiving 2006, I gave out “gratitude rocks” (ala The Secret) as place settings. I told the story of putting it in a pocket and saying thank you for something whenever you felt it. I just talked to my husband’s grandmother last week and she said, “You know that rock you gave me? Every morning I take it from my nightstand and say thank you as I put it in my purse. And at night when I take it out again, I say thank you.”

    It was a little reminder TO ME about how a subtle shift in mindset can… change your life!

    Ria

  55. Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life.

    This post has inspired me to share something that happened to me recently and I am a little afraid that I will sound crazy but I am going to share anyway (did I mention the post inspired me?).

    I am working hard (and sometimes succeeding) at turning negative thoughts to positive by being more realistic and balanced (less pessimistic and prone to panic). And that can really help lift your mood and attitude in difficult situations. You assess this in an intellectual way and know it is true.

    But I discovered a whole other level to gratitude the other evening when I was walking from work to the train station in the twilight. I don’t know why and I don’t know how, nothing special had really happened, but suddenly I felt so aware, and grateful, and connected to everything around me. The cool air swirling around me, the crunch of my shoes on the path, the lights and sounds of traffic going by, the other people walking and talking.

    And I was so grateful to be alive in that moment, and to have the opportunity to be a part of this world, and to be in touch with everything and everyone. I was beyond happy.

    And that is what I think of when I read: Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life.

    I hope I can find that place again.

  56. Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life.

    This post has inspired me to share something that happened to me recently and I am a little afraid that I will sound crazy but I am going to share anyway (did I mention the post inspired me?).

    I am working hard (and sometimes succeeding) at turning negative thoughts to positive by being more realistic and balanced (less pessimistic and prone to panic). And that can really help lift your mood and attitude in difficult situations. You assess this in an intellectual way and know it is true.

    But I discovered a whole other level to gratitude the other evening when I was walking from work to the train station in the twilight. I don’t know why and I don’t know how, nothing special had really happened, but suddenly I felt so aware, and grateful, and connected to everything around me. The cool air swirling around me, the crunch of my shoes on the path, the lights and sounds of traffic going by, the other people walking and talking.

    And I was so grateful to be alive in that moment, and to have the opportunity to be a part of this world, and to be in touch with everything and everyone. I was beyond happy.

    And that is what I think of when I read: Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life.

    I hope I can find that place again.

  57. @Richard – That shifting of thoughts to what you can do, how you can make things better is difficult but a great skill to develop. It doesn’t have to be a solitary effort either. Only this weekend I have had panic attacks but talking to an online friend helped me see there are supportive people out there that can put you back on the right path.

    @Joanna – Thinking of it as a place is useful, we tend to drift away from that place and we have to consciously move back to it.

    @Steve – Some people are naturally just glass half full types. For others that training, nurture and negative tape in our head can take a lot of persistence to over come but it can be. I am naturally a lot more positive for other people than I am myself but I am getting better πŸ™‚

    @Sheamus – Yes I think there is a time where you can fix things and then there are situations where if you stick around you will just be dragged down. Perhaps with close friends and family you will stick at it a bit more too. Some people though are drawn to overtly negative sites, tv shows, groups, and that boggles my mind.

    @Ulla – I think if you are truly grateful and show it then your audience can pick that up, just as if you take them for granted they can also tell. Sometimes it is the small things that make all the difference.

    @Tomoso – I think we all naturally reframe, but tend toward amplifying the scary, absent, or negative aspects rather than seeing the good. “I am missing this” rather than “look at all the great things”

    @Vicky – Being optimistic comes more naturally to me now than it did, and I can be much more optimistic on behalf of others than myself πŸ™‚ It’s a journey rather than a destination πŸ˜‰

    @Sonia – Yup, and I hardly got anything done this weekend because of it. Just shows I need to take my own advice!

    @Julie – I think on a bigger picture scale the gratitude has to be genuine and, yes, come from simple desire to be thankful rather than gain, but on a productivity level shifting gears from “cranky” to “thankful” can only help and be a positive influence. I also find that when I am down, simple acts of kindness for others can bring my own mood up, and I don’t think there is any harm in feeling good by helping someone else πŸ™‚

    @Loraleigh – The world is full of depressants, chemical or otherwise. It takes strength to put them out of reach.

    @Patricia – The ego is not something to be defeated in one sitting. If we get into the good habit of being grateful and positive, I think that alone is an improvement for everyone. With a lighter and clearer head we can work on what our intentions and attachments are?

    @Patty – I think you are right but it doesn’t always feel that way at the time πŸ™‚

    @Ria – I used to do the opposite, I had a rubber band I would wear on my wrist and give myself a good snap when I thought something negative. Started out with a very sore wrist and some funny looks, in the end I left the company I was working for and didn’t need it any more πŸ˜‰

    @Rebecca – It sounds perfectly sane to me πŸ™‚ I had a similar feeling years ago looking out of a hospital window, I think life gives us wake up calls and it is up to us to hold on to what we learn rather than go back into our daily routine just as we were before.

  58. @Richard – That shifting of thoughts to what you can do, how you can make things better is difficult but a great skill to develop. It doesn’t have to be a solitary effort either. Only this weekend I have had panic attacks but talking to an online friend helped me see there are supportive people out there that can put you back on the right path.

    @Joanna – Thinking of it as a place is useful, we tend to drift away from that place and we have to consciously move back to it.

    @Steve – Some people are naturally just glass half full types. For others that training, nurture and negative tape in our head can take a lot of persistence to over come but it can be. I am naturally a lot more positive for other people than I am myself but I am getting better πŸ™‚

    @Sheamus – Yes I think there is a time where you can fix things and then there are situations where if you stick around you will just be dragged down. Perhaps with close friends and family you will stick at it a bit more too. Some people though are drawn to overtly negative sites, tv shows, groups, and that boggles my mind.

    @Ulla – I think if you are truly grateful and show it then your audience can pick that up, just as if you take them for granted they can also tell. Sometimes it is the small things that make all the difference.

    @Tomoso – I think we all naturally reframe, but tend toward amplifying the scary, absent, or negative aspects rather than seeing the good. “I am missing this” rather than “look at all the great things”

    @Vicky – Being optimistic comes more naturally to me now than it did, and I can be much more optimistic on behalf of others than myself πŸ™‚ It’s a journey rather than a destination πŸ˜‰

    @Sonia – Yup, and I hardly got anything done this weekend because of it. Just shows I need to take my own advice!

    @Julie – I think on a bigger picture scale the gratitude has to be genuine and, yes, come from simple desire to be thankful rather than gain, but on a productivity level shifting gears from “cranky” to “thankful” can only help and be a positive influence. I also find that when I am down, simple acts of kindness for others can bring my own mood up, and I don’t think there is any harm in feeling good by helping someone else πŸ™‚

    @Loraleigh – The world is full of depressants, chemical or otherwise. It takes strength to put them out of reach.

    @Patricia – The ego is not something to be defeated in one sitting. If we get into the good habit of being grateful and positive, I think that alone is an improvement for everyone. With a lighter and clearer head we can work on what our intentions and attachments are?

    @Patty – I think you are right but it doesn’t always feel that way at the time πŸ™‚

    @Ria – I used to do the opposite, I had a rubber band I would wear on my wrist and give myself a good snap when I thought something negative. Started out with a very sore wrist and some funny looks, in the end I left the company I was working for and didn’t need it any more πŸ˜‰

    @Rebecca – It sounds perfectly sane to me πŸ™‚ I had a similar feeling years ago looking out of a hospital window, I think life gives us wake up calls and it is up to us to hold on to what we learn rather than go back into our daily routine just as we were before.