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Shocking Statistic

During our free preview call for the Mojo Marketing Action Plan the other day, I asked the following question. Have a guess what the result turned out to be. I wonder if you will be as shocked as I was …

Have you ever had a successful launch?

There were only two possible answers, yes or no. We had a discussion about “success” being however they define it (profit, more customers, grow list, awareness, etc). The question was about how many people who were on the call had achieved their goals with their launches.

What kind of result do you expect? I know I was way off with my prediction.

89% of people who responded had NEVER achieved their product launch goals. Only 11% had ever had a launch that they considered a success.

Now, let us not get hung up on math and I know it is far from scientific, but that surprised me.

Melani and I work with people in our own businesses all the time who need help with launches. Most of them come to us after buying an ebook or DVD box set about product launch strategies, sometimes having spent thousands of dollars. We get that people struggle with this stuff. That said, I didn’t think so few had managed a successful launch.

Have you ever had a successful launch? Would love to know in the comments.

So, as I said above, how you define success plays into this, so let us look at the next result. I did another poll asking how the attendees defined success. What is their primary goal for doing a launch. There are obviously going to be many beneficial aspects of launches, there is a kind of “halo effect” from doing a launch, but if you had to pick just one benefit, what would it be?

  • Boost your profits – A launch is a great way to get a cash injection, because you need the money or because of a new capital expenditure. When I decided to go to SXSW off my own back, I knew I didn’t need to worry about the unbudgeted trip because my little $10 guest posting guide launch had brought in way more than enough to cover everything from flights, hotel and pass through to all my expenses. Certainly makes getting stuff past the purchasing committee (wife) much easier!
  • Grow your list – Every time I do a launch my overall audience grows, but also you can use a focused launch to build a specific, targeted, segmented email list.
  • More customers – If you do not have paying customers then you are not in business. Growing your customer base is key to long term business success. You can launch services, events, or small products, show your value, then nurture that customer into a long term relationship.
  • Raise awareness – Launches bring a great deal of buzz and publicity, and each one is a good excuse for some publicity and hoopla if that is what you want to achieve. If you are releasing a book or other information product in order to achieve expert status and authority, then the awareness building aspects will be key.
  • Other – There are many other reasons, too many to list. For example, many times I will do a joint venture launch just because I think it would be cool to work with a particular person. Melani is a good example, another is Darren, who has such a hypnotic hold over me could probably persuade me to wrestle crocodiles.

What do you guess the results were from this one?

The top two results were “Profit Boost” (38%) and “More Customers” (33%), which I guess are the classic reasons for doing a launch. What I find interesting is, though these are excellent goals, we tend to overlook “Grow List” and “Raise Awareness” (14% apiece), but these goals are very good reasons for choosing to launch rather than just make an offer …

Could your business benefit from a good launch? What kind of profit boost could you use? Do you want to grow your audience or need more people on your list? Could you use more people knowing who you are and what you can offer?

What do you think?

So there you have it, the results of these polls might surprise you or might be exactly what you expected.

Fact is, Melani and I want to do something about that tiny 11% of people who have had successful launches. My grand goal with my business has always been to transform as many small businesses and startups as I can so more people can have a lifestyle like I enjoy. Bit too “warm and fuzzy” for ya? Well, there is the fact that unless you are making money you are not really in business too! πŸ™‚

We positioned this course as a fraction of the price of all those guru products partly to make sure it is affordable for any business, and also, just like when Brian launched Teaching Sells, the first people in get the best deal. Next time we run this course, with all the case studies and testimonials under our belts, expect the price to go up πŸ™‚

If all the ebooks and big honkin’ boxes of DVDs haven’t helped your launches, then it is time to take some actual action, get some guidance, and most importantly, do some successful launches!

Join Melani and I for the Mojo Marketing Action Plan – and, hey – look forward to working together πŸ™‚

Go ahead and join us right now

Because your business needs and deserves a good launch πŸ™‚

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Comments

  1. I learnt the hard way how to do a successful launch. And it cost my three failed ones to get there.

    I’d go so far as to say that almost every single blogger / marketer fails at their first launch, and most at their second. There’s just so much to think about.

    Anything that can help those people understand the process and planning required has got to be good.

  2. I learnt the hard way how to do a successful launch. And it cost my three failed ones to get there.

    I’d go so far as to say that almost every single blogger / marketer fails at their first launch, and most at their second. There’s just so much to think about.

    Anything that can help those people understand the process and planning required has got to be good.

  3. Hey Chris

    You can add me to both sets of stats. I’ve had launches that I considered unsuccessful – but I’ve had a couple that I considered REALLY successful!

    Paul

  4. Hey Chris

    You can add me to both sets of stats. I’ve had launches that I considered unsuccessful – but I’ve had a couple that I considered REALLY successful!

    Paul

  5. @Mike – I was lucky that my first launches were while working for an advertising agency, then my first solo launches were low key with low expectations. I’m also lucky that I have been a part of launches with experienced folks who gave me lots of advice. These are the things I want to benefit the people on the course, it’s usually a lot more fun to learn from OTHERS mistakes πŸ˜‰

    @paul – I bet you learned a lot from each and still benefited, right? πŸ™‚

  6. @Mike – I was lucky that my first launches were while working for an advertising agency, then my first solo launches were low key with low expectations. I’m also lucky that I have been a part of launches with experienced folks who gave me lots of advice. These are the things I want to benefit the people on the course, it’s usually a lot more fun to learn from OTHERS mistakes πŸ˜‰

    @paul – I bet you learned a lot from each and still benefited, right? πŸ™‚

  7. Chris,

    Great post – extremely interesting factoid – but with right around 50% of businesses admitting they can’t report on the performance of the marketing and sales efforts with any confidence, I wish I could say I am shocked. I wonder how many had goals that were hard numbers vs. a ‘…vision of the phone ringing off the hook’ and ‘…on-line orders almost crashing the system’?

  8. Chris,

    Great post – extremely interesting factoid – but with right around 50% of businesses admitting they can’t report on the performance of the marketing and sales efforts with any confidence, I wish I could say I am shocked. I wonder how many had goals that were hard numbers vs. a ‘…vision of the phone ringing off the hook’ and ‘…on-line orders almost crashing the system’?

  9. Rob Kenny says:

    There needs to be an understanding of the levels of expectation for a sucessful launch, are they realistic? Especially with the more solid metrics (increase profit, more customers,grow lists).

    If my niche is small but I try to launch with an expectation of increasing profits by GBP10,000 a week, the chances are it is going to fail.

    Realistic goals are a cornerstone to successful launch.

  10. I bought the expensive guru courses and it sounds great on the sales page but you get the package – you are on your own – and you haven’t got a clue where to start.

    Its been my ambition since finding you to take part in something you offer so I have booked myself on the course with yourself and Melani and am ready for Monday πŸ™‚

    I am one of the people you mentioned who has gone from niche to niche but I finally feel as if I am in a niche I can stay in and that I love which is local search marketing – it is also a niche that will increase over the years so I want to be known as a UK expert on it. I finally feel I have found my “thing”

    Once I complete this course and build a great list as well as make some money with my first launch I will then move on to your authority blogger course too πŸ™‚

    Having been burnt I am hyper sensitive to promises but I get a really great feeling this will come through for me in a warm and fuzzy kind of way. I know I am 100% responsibile for playing my part in making this work – and I am ready!

    Diane Corriette

  11. There needs to be an understanding of the levels of expectation for a sucessful launch, are they realistic? Especially with the more solid metrics (increase profit, more customers,grow lists).

    If my niche is small but I try to launch with an expectation of increasing profits by GBP10,000 a week, the chances are it is going to fail.

    Realistic goals are a cornerstone to successful launch.

  12. I bought the expensive guru courses and it sounds great on the sales page but you get the package – you are on your own – and you haven’t got a clue where to start.

    Its been my ambition since finding you to take part in something you offer so I have booked myself on the course with yourself and Melani and am ready for Monday πŸ™‚

    I am one of the people you mentioned who has gone from niche to niche but I finally feel as if I am in a niche I can stay in and that I love which is local search marketing – it is also a niche that will increase over the years so I want to be known as a UK expert on it. I finally feel I have found my “thing”

    Once I complete this course and build a great list as well as make some money with my first launch I will then move on to your authority blogger course too πŸ™‚

    Having been burnt I am hyper sensitive to promises but I get a really great feeling this will come through for me in a warm and fuzzy kind of way. I know I am 100% responsibile for playing my part in making this work – and I am ready!

    Diane Corriette

  13. @patmcgraw – Excellent point! One of my first launches was a .net programming live class, I fully expected nobody to take me up so getting one customer would have been a “success”, but nowadays it seems as though every launch needs to be 7 figures for people to feel happy πŸ™‚

    @Rob – Yup, realistic goals and a solid plan directed at those goals, with concious course-correction along the way πŸ™‚

    @Diane –

    I bought the expensive guru courses and it sounds great on the sales page but you get the package – you are on your own – and you haven’t got a clue where to start.

    – this is something I hear a LOT, and not just when it comes to launches but internet marketing seems particular guilty of this. Awesome to have you on board Diane! πŸ˜€

  14. @patmcgraw – Excellent point! One of my first launches was a .net programming live class, I fully expected nobody to take me up so getting one customer would have been a “success”, but nowadays it seems as though every launch needs to be 7 figures for people to feel happy πŸ™‚

    @Rob – Yup, realistic goals and a solid plan directed at those goals, with concious course-correction along the way πŸ™‚

    @Diane –

    I bought the expensive guru courses and it sounds great on the sales page but you get the package – you are on your own – and you haven’t got a clue where to start.

    – this is something I hear a LOT, and not just when it comes to launches but internet marketing seems particular guilty of this. Awesome to have you on board Diane! πŸ˜€

  15. I plan to launch my own products in the coming years. Now I’m in the process of collecting ideas that will be included in my ebook. And this post is an eye opener because it gives me lessons in launching my own good products that will not only boost my customers but also my income.

  16. I plan to launch my own products in the coming years. Now I’m in the process of collecting ideas that will be included in my ebook. And this post is an eye opener because it gives me lessons in launching my own good products that will not only boost my customers but also my income.

  17. You coordinated this post with Seth Godin, didn’t you? πŸ˜‰

    If you haven’t seen it yet, here’s what he had to say about what he calls the MOST successful product launch to date.

    http://bit.ly/b1o2XH

  18. You coordinated this post with Seth Godin, didn’t you? πŸ˜‰

    If you haven’t seen it yet, here’s what he had to say about what he calls the MOST successful product launch to date.

    http://bit.ly/b1o2XH

  19. @Eleazar – great stuff, and good luck with your products πŸ™‚

    @Alex – Awesome! Will check it out. Wish I could say “great minds ..” but nobody is in the same league as the almighty Godin πŸ˜‰

  20. @Eleazar – great stuff, and good luck with your products πŸ™‚

    @Alex – Awesome! Will check it out. Wish I could say “great minds ..” but nobody is in the same league as the almighty Godin πŸ˜‰

  21. I’m writing an e-course at the moment and it is really hard to make sure you’ve got all the different elements of what makes a successful launch covered – or in fact just knowing what they are! Authority Blogger has been a huge source of inspiration and knowledge as has ‘Crush It’ by @garyvee and ‘Inbound Marketing’ from the HubSpot guys all of which have helped me knuckle down and put the ground work in – I think the important thing to remember is that it takes hard work to be successful and to ignore the ‘guru courses’ that promise overnight riches
    Keep up the great work πŸ˜€

  22. I’m writing an e-course at the moment and it is really hard to make sure you’ve got all the different elements of what makes a successful launch covered – or in fact just knowing what they are! Authority Blogger has been a huge source of inspiration and knowledge as has ‘Crush It’ by @garyvee and ‘Inbound Marketing’ from the HubSpot guys all of which have helped me knuckle down and put the ground work in – I think the important thing to remember is that it takes hard work to be successful and to ignore the ‘guru courses’ that promise overnight riches
    Keep up the great work πŸ˜€

  23. I’m shocked its as high as 11%. I’d have guessed more like 5%. But then in my head an unsuccessful launch would also include people who never got the product launched to begin with.

  24. I’m shocked its as high as 11%. I’d have guessed more like 5%. But then in my head an unsuccessful launch would also include people who never got the product launched to begin with.

  25. I’ve had a couple of reasonably successful launches and I feel that the 2 most important aspects of a successful launch are:
    1) Initially becoming a well respected authority on your topic by producing and offering great free content and interacting with your community
    2) After you launch have a follow-up plan, perhaps offering related products or services and use the launch as a springboard to future success

    Well, that’s the aim anyway πŸ™‚

  26. I’ve had a couple of reasonably successful launches and I feel that the 2 most important aspects of a successful launch are:
    1) Initially becoming a well respected authority on your topic by producing and offering great free content and interacting with your community
    2) After you launch have a follow-up plan, perhaps offering related products or services and use the launch as a springboard to future success

    Well, that’s the aim anyway πŸ™‚

  27. Yep, glad you highlighted this.

    As someone who has worked in PR for many years, I consistently see people launching products or services which they feel are going to rock the world.

    Fair play to them, you need enthusiasm and belief to make it in life.

    But they often fail to realise that there are hundreds of launches every day and that their little baby is not that special in the scheme of things.

    I think it would be better to start from the viewpoint of “no one cares a toss about my new product/service so I need to really persuade everyone I come across that it is really special”. Go the extra mile, leave no stone unturned, knock on every door, etc. etc.

    Most entrepreneurs believe that everyone is going to give their launch their full attention and be totally bowled over. Unless it’s the next iPad, they probably won’t.

    I feel that a good starting point would be, believe it’s amazing but manage your expectations realistically.

    Anyway, I can’t sit around here talking all day, I’ve got a company to relaunch. And you’re gonna be completely blown away when it happens. πŸ˜‰

  28. I launched my first solo product a few months ago (in a blizzard). Like your .net programming class, I figured success would be one sale (since I was nervous about the whole thing).

    I got the first sale about 3 minutes after I sent the email. More followed. Not 7 figures worth, but I was delighted!

  29. Yep, glad you highlighted this.

    As someone who has worked in PR for many years, I consistently see people launching products or services which they feel are going to rock the world.

    Fair play to them, you need enthusiasm and belief to make it in life.

    But they often fail to realise that there are hundreds of launches every day and that their little baby is not that special in the scheme of things.

    I think it would be better to start from the viewpoint of “no one cares a toss about my new product/service so I need to really persuade everyone I come across that it is really special”. Go the extra mile, leave no stone unturned, knock on every door, etc. etc.

    Most entrepreneurs believe that everyone is going to give their launch their full attention and be totally bowled over. Unless it’s the next iPad, they probably won’t.

    I feel that a good starting point would be, believe it’s amazing but manage your expectations realistically.

    Anyway, I can’t sit around here talking all day, I’ve got a company to relaunch. And you’re gonna be completely blown away when it happens. πŸ˜‰

  30. I launched my first solo product a few months ago (in a blizzard). Like your .net programming class, I figured success would be one sale (since I was nervous about the whole thing).

    I got the first sale about 3 minutes after I sent the email. More followed. Not 7 figures worth, but I was delighted!

  31. I did exactly one blog launch, and it was a total success. It was a “making of” kind of behind the scenes blog leading up to a DVD movie release. I knew the target audience of the movie and marketed the blog through one blog aggregator and four or five forums directed at that audience. The blog ran for only half a year, with about one or two posts per week.

    The first print run of the DVD was sold out within two weeks after the release date.

    But that was a “perfect storm” affair where I could pinpoint the marketing in a way that I was not able to repeat – which is why I didn’t even try.

  32. I did exactly one blog launch, and it was a total success. It was a “making of” kind of behind the scenes blog leading up to a DVD movie release. I knew the target audience of the movie and marketed the blog through one blog aggregator and four or five forums directed at that audience. The blog ran for only half a year, with about one or two posts per week.

    The first print run of the DVD was sold out within two weeks after the release date.

    But that was a “perfect storm” affair where I could pinpoint the marketing in a way that I was not able to repeat – which is why I didn’t even try.

  33. Hi Chris,

    Funny you should ask. I have just recently have been having a good launch of a website and now planning my first product launch… the scary part. I am still a ways to go but excited about your question, my response, and what the hell to do next. I will definitely keep you in mind as I get further down the line.
    Good job, Chris.
    devin

  34. Hi Chris,

    Funny you should ask. I have just recently have been having a good launch of a website and now planning my first product launch… the scary part. I am still a ways to go but excited about your question, my response, and what the hell to do next. I will definitely keep you in mind as I get further down the line.
    Good job, Chris.
    devin

  35. I’m in the middle of failing my second or succeeding at my first, not sure which.

    More to the point, I picked up N & D’s guide about a month ago, and I’m doing a “pre-launch” right now. About to start guest posting.

    I’ve been following along with the Mojo launch. Feels right.

  36. I’m in the middle of failing my second or succeeding at my first, not sure which.

    More to the point, I picked up N & D’s guide about a month ago, and I’m doing a “pre-launch” right now. About to start guest posting.

    I’ve been following along with the Mojo launch. Feels right.

  37. Hi Chris,

    Wow, some great information!!! I must admit to you Chris I have been getting your e-mails for a while. Today was the first time I really sat down and read them. I wrote an eBook and now have a blog and website. But it has been an up hill battle getting traffice to them. I am very new to all this internet marketing. I was just discussing with my partner the other day that we have no comments on our blog. Reading your blog has given me some great insight to how to go about this. So thank you and to your fellow bloggers for the wonderful advise.

  38. Hi Chris,

    Wow, some great information!!! I must admit to you Chris I have been getting your e-mails for a while. Today was the first time I really sat down and read them. I wrote an eBook and now have a blog and website. But it has been an up hill battle getting traffice to them. I am very new to all this internet marketing. I was just discussing with my partner the other day that we have no comments on our blog. Reading your blog has given me some great insight to how to go about this. So thank you and to your fellow bloggers for the wonderful advise.

  39. @lyz – Yup, the guru courses can give you pointers but nothing beats *doing* πŸ˜€ Congrats, I am sure you will rock it πŸ™‚

    @Paul – Oh yeah, totally. I know a bunch of people who are sitting on stellar products “waiting for the right time” πŸ™‚

    @David – I agree, follow through and follow up!

    @alfoxy – Looking forward to it πŸ™‚

    @Jodi – It’s very cool when those orders come in isn’t it? I know a couple of people who have sound effects set for when order emails arrive πŸ™‚

    @Dirk R. – That sounds very exciting πŸ™‚

    @Devin – Definitely the scary part but also an adrenalin rush πŸ™‚

    @Dave – Got to love Naomi and Dave πŸ™‚

    @Penni – I think you can see how I do it, I ask for comments – nothing up my sleeves πŸ™‚

  40. @lyz – Yup, the guru courses can give you pointers but nothing beats *doing* πŸ˜€ Congrats, I am sure you will rock it πŸ™‚

    @Paul – Oh yeah, totally. I know a bunch of people who are sitting on stellar products “waiting for the right time” πŸ™‚

    @David – I agree, follow through and follow up!

    @alfoxy – Looking forward to it πŸ™‚

    @Jodi – It’s very cool when those orders come in isn’t it? I know a couple of people who have sound effects set for when order emails arrive πŸ™‚

    @Dirk R. – That sounds very exciting πŸ™‚

    @Devin – Definitely the scary part but also an adrenalin rush πŸ™‚

    @Dave – Got to love Naomi and Dave πŸ™‚

    @Penni – I think you can see how I do it, I ask for comments – nothing up my sleeves πŸ™‚

  41. The failure rate isn’t surprising. I’ve had a number of successful launches, to go with a few that were not so great.

    Some common themes of failed launches:

    1) Broadcasting instead of engaging the audience. When you get someone’s attention, you’d better be talking about them and not yourself or your product.
    2) Confusing the audience – there are a lot of ways to do this, but the easiest way is trying to be everything to everybody.
    3) Skipping steps in order to launch faster – like doing a teaser, then opening the doors. You forgot to build anticipation there – when they start digging up your home phone number and begging you to sell it to them now, then you’re ready to open the doors.
    4) Almost… if you keep something really cool in reserve, like they’re going to get free shipping even, tell them that – and THEN open the doors.

    Launches are like copywriting in slow motion. The product exists because it fills a need or solves a problem. So start by naming the problem and engaging the audience. Agitate. Ask them to share their biggest question or challenge with this. Your product probably solves these problems but they’re telling you what benefits you need to express.

    Make it easy for people to share links and stories with social media. Launches should be easier than ever because most people can tell a lot of friends with the push of a button. If you’re talking about stuff they care about they will do that.

    Show them what’s different now, what is possible in the brave new world that has your product in it. Let them live the ownership experience vicariously through others – reporters, beta testers, past customers. Apple’s January iPad event is a good example, case studies and testimonials work too.

    Reveal a cool feature or two, with obvious benefits, then repeat those benefits anyway. The “rotation lock button” on the iPad wasn’t mentioned in January – it was there, but they waited to leak that out. Apple can count on bloggers and media to get the message out, most of us have to email and post on our blogs and Tweet and stuff – either way works.

    A good launch is an Event. It takes time to plan and execute. It’s less about having a huge audience, and more about making the most of the audience you have.

    Launches can be a pain, but when it’s done you’ll have a larger audience and more cash. When you keep doing it, people get used to it, and the first signals of a new launch start the cycle of anticipation much more quickly. Apple’s launches are a good example of this effect – even when they are not launching anything, the world is buzzing with what they *might* launch next.

  42. The failure rate isn’t surprising. I’ve had a number of successful launches, to go with a few that were not so great.

    Some common themes of failed launches:

    1) Broadcasting instead of engaging the audience. When you get someone’s attention, you’d better be talking about them and not yourself or your product.
    2) Confusing the audience – there are a lot of ways to do this, but the easiest way is trying to be everything to everybody.
    3) Skipping steps in order to launch faster – like doing a teaser, then opening the doors. You forgot to build anticipation there – when they start digging up your home phone number and begging you to sell it to them now, then you’re ready to open the doors.
    4) Almost… if you keep something really cool in reserve, like they’re going to get free shipping even, tell them that – and THEN open the doors.

    Launches are like copywriting in slow motion. The product exists because it fills a need or solves a problem. So start by naming the problem and engaging the audience. Agitate. Ask them to share their biggest question or challenge with this. Your product probably solves these problems but they’re telling you what benefits you need to express.

    Make it easy for people to share links and stories with social media. Launches should be easier than ever because most people can tell a lot of friends with the push of a button. If you’re talking about stuff they care about they will do that.

    Show them what’s different now, what is possible in the brave new world that has your product in it. Let them live the ownership experience vicariously through others – reporters, beta testers, past customers. Apple’s January iPad event is a good example, case studies and testimonials work too.

    Reveal a cool feature or two, with obvious benefits, then repeat those benefits anyway. The “rotation lock button” on the iPad wasn’t mentioned in January – it was there, but they waited to leak that out. Apple can count on bloggers and media to get the message out, most of us have to email and post on our blogs and Tweet and stuff – either way works.

    A good launch is an Event. It takes time to plan and execute. It’s less about having a huge audience, and more about making the most of the audience you have.

    Launches can be a pain, but when it’s done you’ll have a larger audience and more cash. When you keep doing it, people get used to it, and the first signals of a new launch start the cycle of anticipation much more quickly. Apple’s launches are a good example of this effect – even when they are not launching anything, the world is buzzing with what they *might* launch next.

  43. Thanks Dan, great comment – that would make an awesome post! πŸ˜€

  44. Thanks Dan, great comment – that would make an awesome post! πŸ˜€

  45. I’ve only ever had one launch last month (a full scale one for a product, not just putting a consulting page on your blog) and it was highly successful by any stretch of the word. Of course, there are always things that could have be done better, but if you can 90% of the way there pretty well & on target and surpass your preliminary goals… sounds like a success to me.

    Little do many understand though that I didn’t achieve success by working from a blueprint or from someone telling me to do X-Y-Z. It took a good 6 months of absorbing information and OBSERVING other people’s launches, especially the successful ones. Watching what they do, in detail, from a very analytical point of view and asking the questions:

    Why are they doing X?
    What exactly are they looking to achieve with X?
    How does X fit in to the end result of the entire launch?

    After studying these launches, even if you have no care in the world to buy the product being pitched whatsoever, then it’s time to see what concepts apply across the board, how each launch served to address that concept and what different types of tactics were utilized to achieve the results.

    The final questions would then be: How can I integrate these concepts into *my* launch? What tactics would best serve *my* purposes and goals? Is there anything different in my product or niche that would benefit from an alternate methodology, but still adhere to the base concepts, that would be more effective?

    Don’t underestimate the power of observation. Sometimes you learn *much* more by watching others do what they do then read what they write.

  46. I’ve only ever had one launch last month (a full scale one for a product, not just putting a consulting page on your blog) and it was highly successful by any stretch of the word. Of course, there are always things that could have be done better, but if you can 90% of the way there pretty well & on target and surpass your preliminary goals… sounds like a success to me.

    Little do many understand though that I didn’t achieve success by working from a blueprint or from someone telling me to do X-Y-Z. It took a good 6 months of absorbing information and OBSERVING other people’s launches, especially the successful ones. Watching what they do, in detail, from a very analytical point of view and asking the questions:

    Why are they doing X?
    What exactly are they looking to achieve with X?
    How does X fit in to the end result of the entire launch?

    After studying these launches, even if you have no care in the world to buy the product being pitched whatsoever, then it’s time to see what concepts apply across the board, how each launch served to address that concept and what different types of tactics were utilized to achieve the results.

    The final questions would then be: How can I integrate these concepts into *my* launch? What tactics would best serve *my* purposes and goals? Is there anything different in my product or niche that would benefit from an alternate methodology, but still adhere to the base concepts, that would be more effective?

    Don’t underestimate the power of observation. Sometimes you learn *much* more by watching others do what they do then read what they write.

  47. Good point Jordan – the WHY is crucial, and as you say, fitting it into your own approach so it is consistant with both your goals and your style.

    For example the recent launches with the teasing “Sold out …. ooh, look, we just found some … sold out again … oops, we forgot the ‘water damaged’ mp3s under the table … sold out … silly me, we have 1,000 copies left … sold out” might be ‘successful’ but certainly wouldn’t suit my style πŸ™‚

  48. Good point Jordan – the WHY is crucial, and as you say, fitting it into your own approach so it is consistant with both your goals and your style.

    For example the recent launches with the teasing “Sold out …. ooh, look, we just found some … sold out again … oops, we forgot the ‘water damaged’ mp3s under the table … sold out … silly me, we have 1,000 copies left … sold out” might be ‘successful’ but certainly wouldn’t suit my style πŸ™‚

  49. @Chris: Love the special email sound idea! The other fun thing is waking up and discovering you’ve made money in your sleep.

    @Dan and Jordan: Your comments are practically a “how to launch” manual in themselves. πŸ™‚

  50. @Chris: Love the special email sound idea! The other fun thing is waking up and discovering you’ve made money in your sleep.

    @Dan and Jordan: Your comments are practically a “how to launch” manual in themselves. πŸ™‚

  51. Ours was different to most online launches in that it was a travel guide–digital–and we had a good following already. We sold a lot in the first few weeks and then it slowed. It was an interesting experience. Stressful as hell. Thanks for the article and great comments here too. It’s been fun interacting with buyers since. We’ve met amazing people online who bought the guide. That’s a bonus.

  52. Ours was different to most online launches in that it was a travel guide–digital–and we had a good following already. We sold a lot in the first few weeks and then it slowed. It was an interesting experience. Stressful as hell. Thanks for the article and great comments here too. It’s been fun interacting with buyers since. We’ve met amazing people online who bought the guide. That’s a bonus.

  53. Really nice post Chris. Its an eye opener for most of us. I firmly believe that you can do anything and market any product or idea in the world as long as you are willing enough to do so. Believing in yourself and moving forward is indeed the key to success. The sad part is that I had few friends with really good ideas but when they went on to share it with others, they got such a negative response that they left it altogether. Which is indeed a shame.

  54. Really nice post Chris. Its an eye opener for most of us. I firmly believe that you can do anything and market any product or idea in the world as long as you are willing enough to do so. Believing in yourself and moving forward is indeed the key to success. The sad part is that I had few friends with really good ideas but when they went on to share it with others, they got such a negative response that they left it altogether. Which is indeed a shame.

  55. Helo! Sorry for my bad English. I have read your blog many times but never commented. Have read your post about comments and that made me think. From now on I will comment at least once a day. πŸ™‚ Thanks for a great blog! / Patrik from Sweden.

  56. Helo! Sorry for my bad English. I have read your blog many times but never commented. Have read your post about comments and that made me think. From now on I will comment at least once a day. πŸ™‚ Thanks for a great blog! / Patrik from Sweden.

  57. I am neither shocked nor surprised. Due to all kinds of online councelling, just ANYONE thinks he is able to launch his own business. The statistic shows that it is not so. Lets be realistic: Those who know how to do business do succeed and those who think that they may earn lots of cash without making efforts fail.

    Today there is just too much going on in the selling blogworld and one needs a really good and new product (idea) in order to succeed !

  58. I am neither shocked nor surprised. Due to all kinds of online councelling, just ANYONE thinks he is able to launch his own business. The statistic shows that it is not so. Lets be realistic: Those who know how to do business do succeed and those who think that they may earn lots of cash without making efforts fail.

    Today there is just too much going on in the selling blogworld and one needs a really good and new product (idea) in order to succeed !