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Do You WWW?

One of the most common issues with blogs that I critique is the WWW/No-WWW issue. That is where you can see the same content with both the WWW. in the URL and without. Doesn’t seem like much of a problem?

  1. There is a theory around SEO circles that having content available on both creates problems in search engines with either duplicate content or counting links or both.
  2. A growing movement is trying to remove the WWW. because it is unnecessary
  3. For usability concerns at the very least you want all versions to work and not throw up an error

While there are as many people who argue against this, I have 301 redirected my URLs one way or the other for a long time and found visible benefits, especially where links are concerned. The worst case scenario is where someone links to your site and the visitor gets access denied or a 404 page not found error.

Using a WordPress plugin, .htaccess, or in some cases your web hosting control panel, you can quite easily redirect from the URL you don’t use to the one you prefer. Obviously the No-WWW people would like you to redirect the WWW. version to the non-WWW version but as you can see on this particular blog, I do it the other way.

So now I have described the issue in brief … Do you WWW.?

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Comments

  1. I don’t WWW but that’s not because I wanted it that way. Simply put, I don’t know what WWW does, and whether it’s more beneficial or not to WWW (I’ve read contradicting articles somewhere in the net).

    And, somebody once told me not to mess with my .htaccess file unless I know what to do with it, which I don’t, LOL.

  2. I don’t WWW but that’s not because I wanted it that way. Simply put, I don’t know what WWW does, and whether it’s more beneficial or not to WWW (I’ve read contradicting articles somewhere in the net).

    And, somebody once told me not to mess with my .htaccess file unless I know what to do with it, which I don’t, LOL.

  3. I use the WWW. If nothing else, because I’d like the flexibility of using sub-domains without confusing anyone with having ‘eyeflare.com’ and ‘foo.eyeflare.com’. Having both as ‘type.site.tld’ just seems more logical. And… supposedly the www is the standard name for the web server address.

    Of course, old habits die hard.

  4. I use the WWW. If nothing else, because I’d like the flexibility of using sub-domains without confusing anyone with having ‘eyeflare.com’ and ‘foo.eyeflare.com’. Having both as ‘type.site.tld’ just seems more logical. And… supposedly the www is the standard name for the web server address.

    Of course, old habits die hard.

  5. Chris,

    I am glad that you raised this issue. I have been worried about this. My blog is no-WWW. However, I think that a lot of people automatically type www.

    What are the benefits of the 301 redirect?

  6. Chris,

    I am glad that you raised this issue. I have been worried about this. My blog is no-WWW. However, I think that a lot of people automatically type www.

    What are the benefits of the 301 redirect?

  7. I haven’t really thought about it. Then again, I’m no SEO enthusiast or expert. As long as readers can view my blog with or without the .www I’m happy.

    I would hope search engines were advanced enough to overcome any problems created by people accessing sites with or without the www extension. It’s a pretty basic thing.

  8. I haven’t really thought about it. Then again, I’m no SEO enthusiast or expert. As long as readers can view my blog with or without the .www I’m happy.

    I would hope search engines were advanced enough to overcome any problems created by people accessing sites with or without the www extension. It’s a pretty basic thing.

  9. I really don’t see why there is so much fuss around this.

    Just like you’ve mentioned, there are easy solutions to redirect from one to the other.

    So, if there is really no difference after the redirect between www or no www, why the fuss??

    Typing in 4 letters (www and .) can’t be so time consuming or difficult after all. 😉

  10. I really don’t see why there is so much fuss around this.

    Just like you’ve mentioned, there are easy solutions to redirect from one to the other.

    So, if there is really no difference after the redirect between www or no www, why the fuss??

    Typing in 4 letters (www and .) can’t be so time consuming or difficult after all. 😉

  11. I tried the htaccess thingy after reading a john chow blog and totally frigged it up. wouldnt you know theres a plug-in for it. Maybe I’ll give that a go and see if I can screw that up too !!

  12. I tried the htaccess thingy after reading a john chow blog and totally frigged it up. wouldnt you know theres a plug-in for it. Maybe I’ll give that a go and see if I can screw that up too !!

  13. I like the www. version better myself.

    However, URL canonicalization (as Google calls it) is more than just an SEO theory:

    http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/seo-advice-url-canonicalization/
    http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/canonicalization-update/

    Search engines can’t think for themselves: if you have a page that’s accessible in both a www version and a non-www version, they think it’s two separate pages. (Add,l apparently, some sites do have different www and non-www versions.) Not employing a 301 redirect one way or the other means that links to http://yourdomain.com don’t sent “link juice” to http://www.yourdomain.com .

  14. I like the www. version better myself.

    However, URL canonicalization (as Google calls it) is more than just an SEO theory:

    http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/seo-advice-url-canonicalization/
    http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/canonicalization-update/

    Search engines can’t think for themselves: if you have a page that’s accessible in both a www version and a non-www version, they think it’s two separate pages. (Add,l apparently, some sites do have different www and non-www versions.) Not employing a 301 redirect one way or the other means that links to http://yourdomain.com don’t sent “link juice” to http://www.yourdomain.com .

  15. I suppose one day the WWW will disappear – I remember the time when they advertised a web address on TV and always gave out the “h-t-t-p colon forward slash forward-slash” bit – which always made me smile.

    Now the WWW part is being dropped. I suppose it’s a good thing, although I think the only thing that will have a major impact is if/when the major browsers decide to get rid of the whole “http://www.” part altogether.

    I know I can type chrisg.com into my browser and get to the right place, but the browser still adds the “http://www.” part.

    Incidentally, I think del.icio.us must be losing traffic. The amount of times I’ve typed http://www.del.icio.us into my browser, only to get the “server not found” error. If I’m making that mistake (and I’m fairly net savvy), then I’m sure others must be too. Wonder how many other net “gaps” there are out there?

    Paul Hancox

  16. I suppose one day the WWW will disappear – I remember the time when they advertised a web address on TV and always gave out the “h-t-t-p colon forward slash forward-slash” bit – which always made me smile.

    Now the WWW part is being dropped. I suppose it’s a good thing, although I think the only thing that will have a major impact is if/when the major browsers decide to get rid of the whole “http://www.” part altogether.

    I know I can type chrisg.com into my browser and get to the right place, but the browser still adds the “http://www.” part.

    Incidentally, I think del.icio.us must be losing traffic. The amount of times I’ve typed http://www.del.icio.us into my browser, only to get the “server not found” error. If I’m making that mistake (and I’m fairly net savvy), then I’m sure others must be too. Wonder how many other net “gaps” there are out there?

    Paul Hancox

  17. I www and use the wordpress plugin to do it (thanks to you).

  18. I www and use the wordpress plugin to do it (thanks to you).

  19. I do. I use the Enforce www. Preference plugin mentioned in my latest post. It not only deals with whichever version you’ve decided to use (depending upon whatever URL is listed in the WordPress admin page), but also deals with index.php redirects.

  20. I do. I use the Enforce www. Preference plugin mentioned in my latest post. It not only deals with whichever version you’ve decided to use (depending upon whatever URL is listed in the WordPress admin page), but also deals with index.php redirects.

  21. I’ve redirected all traffic from davidairey.com to http://www.davidairey.com.

    People, for the most part, associate web addresses with www, and when I show my site location on promotional material I always use the prefix, so it’s consistency that needs to be kept.

    I don’t think the effects, one way or the other, are going to be much, providing you choose one of the two options.

  22. I’ve redirected all traffic from davidairey.com to http://www.davidairey.com.

    People, for the most part, associate web addresses with www, and when I show my site location on promotional material I always use the prefix, so it’s consistency that needs to be kept.

    I don’t think the effects, one way or the other, are going to be much, providing you choose one of the two options.

  23. Good tip. I have thought about this in the past but never acted. I have heard that the 301 redirects are seo friendly. Looks like the non-www for both of my sites just got added to the list. Thanks.

  24. Good tip. I have thought about this in the past but never acted. I have heard that the 301 redirects are seo friendly. Looks like the non-www for both of my sites just got added to the list. Thanks.

  25. Hey Chris,

    Why DO you choose the WWW over the non?

    I can get my brain around the duplicate content issue and can see the value in doing one or the other…

    But what are the visible benefits you’ve found with prioritizing the WWW?

  26. Hey Chris,

    Why DO you choose the WWW over the non?

    I can get my brain around the duplicate content issue and can see the value in doing one or the other…

    But what are the visible benefits you’ve found with prioritizing the WWW?

  27. I was thinking about this these days. On one hand, it is true that the www. is totally unnecessary, and it is avoided in some very successful sites like molly.com and del.icio.us

    On the other hand, anything started with www. seems to naturally belong to the web. .com also naturally belongs to the web, but not all TLDs are well known and in fact del.icio.us strategy is a brave one. Hadn’t been they became such a successful site, nobody would gess that is a web address.

    Personally I do the 301 thing myself and use the www but I use no plugin, I edited the .htaccess file myself. The plugin might be a nice upgrade.

  28. I was thinking about this these days. On one hand, it is true that the www. is totally unnecessary, and it is avoided in some very successful sites like molly.com and del.icio.us

    On the other hand, anything started with www. seems to naturally belong to the web. .com also naturally belongs to the web, but not all TLDs are well known and in fact del.icio.us strategy is a brave one. Hadn’t been they became such a successful site, nobody would gess that is a web address.

    Personally I do the 301 thing myself and use the www but I use no plugin, I edited the .htaccess file myself. The plugin might be a nice upgrade.

  29. Chris, usually I do www. I am one of the ones that would definitely suggest 301’ing one version to the other, no matter which direction you go.

  30. Chris, usually I do www. I am one of the ones that would definitely suggest 301’ing one version to the other, no matter which direction you go.

  31. On my personal blog I don’t use www.

    On my business blog I DO use www.

    Basically the reason why my business blog does is because it’s pretty old now and established itself with the www back in the day. When I start a website today I don’t use the www.

  32. Chris,

    I always www for two reasons:
    1. On a lot of shared hosting environments (where one physical web server serves multiple sites) you have to have the www there. That’s mainly a limitation of how they configured the server, but it seems like it is “in vogue.”

    2. I think that while the WWW is not technically necessary, subdomains (ie the www or say the blogwelldone part of blogwelldone.wordpress.com) is becoming more and more popular which, I feel, makes remembering to add the subdomain even more popular. It makes sense to keep it there for that reason.

    There’s probably a third reason, force of habit, throw in for good measure, but those are the two main reasons I do it.

  33. On my personal blog I don’t use www.

    On my business blog I DO use www.

    Basically the reason why my business blog does is because it’s pretty old now and established itself with the www back in the day. When I start a website today I don’t use the www.

  34. Chris,

    I always www for two reasons:
    1. On a lot of shared hosting environments (where one physical web server serves multiple sites) you have to have the www there. That’s mainly a limitation of how they configured the server, but it seems like it is “in vogue.”

    2. I think that while the WWW is not technically necessary, subdomains (ie the www or say the blogwelldone part of blogwelldone.wordpress.com) is becoming more and more popular which, I feel, makes remembering to add the subdomain even more popular. It makes sense to keep it there for that reason.

    There’s probably a third reason, force of habit, throw in for good measure, but those are the two main reasons I do it.

  35. Yes, I do www.

    I use this mod_rewrite rule in .htaccess to redirect:

    RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^(.*).webmasterview.com$ [NC]
    RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.webmasterview.com/$1 [R=301,L]

  36. Yes, I do www.

    I use this mod_rewrite rule in .htaccess to redirect:

    RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^(.*)\.webmasterview\.com$ [NC]
    RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.webmasterview.com/$1 [R=301,L]

  37. I used to prefer the www versions for redirects (no particular reason), until using WordPress. I found that several of the themes caused major issues when redirecting with the htaccess file (such as disabling comments, having login problems occasionally, etc.), as well as when I would use the www-redirect plugin to direct the non-www to www version.

    The only way things worked across the board for all of my WP blogs was to switch it to directing www to non-www. I have no idea why that is, but that’s how it worked out.

    After switching everything over, it wasn’t long before I started seeing PR jumping for a few sites, so it definitely made a difference in link counts.

  38. I used to prefer the www versions for redirects (no particular reason), until using WordPress. I found that several of the themes caused major issues when redirecting with the htaccess file (such as disabling comments, having login problems occasionally, etc.), as well as when I would use the www-redirect plugin to direct the non-www to www version.

    The only way things worked across the board for all of my WP blogs was to switch it to directing www to non-www. I have no idea why that is, but that’s how it worked out.

    After switching everything over, it wasn’t long before I started seeing PR jumping for a few sites, so it definitely made a difference in link counts.

  39. Google, Yahoo, Ask, eBay, etc, redirects non-www to www, and they don’t need to worry about search engine rankings. That should be enough proof. Case closed.

  40. Google, Yahoo, Ask, eBay, etc, redirects non-www to www, and they don’t need to worry about search engine rankings. That should be enough proof. Case closed.

  41. My link preference has always been to point to www but I never thought to (301) redirect all requests there. The element of external links didn’t cross my mind.

    I did set a preference in Google Webmaster Tools to treat all links as www (from the Preferred Domain panel). This step has seemed to combat duplicate content (at least from a Google perspective).

    Thanks for the tip…I am going to take a look at setting up a redirect this afternoon.

  42. My link preference has always been to point to www but I never thought to (301) redirect all requests there. The element of external links didn’t cross my mind.

    I did set a preference in Google Webmaster Tools to treat all links as www (from the Preferred Domain panel). This step has seemed to combat duplicate content (at least from a Google perspective).

    Thanks for the tip…I am going to take a look at setting up a redirect this afternoon.

  43. I don’t use WWW, and I don’t see much of a point to it. I don’t even bother typing it in for other sites, most of the time. Unfortunately, I’ve experienced a few site recently where excluding the WWW resulted in a 404.

    I haven’t set up a 301 on any of my sites, but I keep meaning too. I have no idea of the code to edit the .htaccess (though, it’s probably not difficult), but since you’ve linked to a handy WordPress plugin, I might just use that instead.

  44. I don’t use WWW, and I don’t see much of a point to it. I don’t even bother typing it in for other sites, most of the time. Unfortunately, I’ve experienced a few site recently where excluding the WWW resulted in a 404.

    I haven’t set up a 301 on any of my sites, but I keep meaning too. I have no idea of the code to edit the .htaccess (though, it’s probably not difficult), but since you’ve linked to a handy WordPress plugin, I might just use that instead.

  45. I 302 my non-www to my www

    For me it’s a fashion statement – I don’t prefer how the non-www’s look. That’s it. But having two entirely separate pages? Big no-no if you care about Google.

    PLUS – if you 301 redirect one to the other (doesn’t matter which) then you get the combined value of links directed at both. Otherwise, they’re spread out between the two pages.

  46. I 302 my non-www to my www

    For me it’s a fashion statement – I don’t prefer how the non-www’s look. That’s it. But having two entirely separate pages? Big no-no if you care about Google.

    PLUS – if you 301 redirect one to the other (doesn’t matter which) then you get the combined value of links directed at both. Otherwise, they’re spread out between the two pages.

  47. Arne Midtlund says:

    I do really fine without the www. My website is about judo and an important principle is “maximum efficient use of power”. judomania.org is easy to remember even for the old judopeople in my club. 🙂

  48. I do really fine without the www. My website is about judo and an important principle is “maximum efficient use of power”. judomania.org is easy to remember even for the old judopeople in my club. 🙂

  49. Never been here before. Someone just gave me the link and popped over, not even knowing what the general topic would be.

    Anyway, you can also use the Google Webmaster Tools to tell Google which domain to prefer.

    In theory (that is to say, when I’m not too lazy or too distracted), I 301 everything to the non-WWW domain because it takes longer to say the WWW than the whole rest of the domain.

    I’ve seen big companies not available without WWW. Recently tried to go to the ASUS site (I think) because I got a new computer and needed updated drivers for the motherboard. I literally got a “Directory Listing Denied” for http://asus.com. I can’t believe that a TECH company could be so dumb.

    Just curious, but why keep the WWW? Whim or do you actually have a reason.

  50. Never been here before. Someone just gave me the link and popped over, not even knowing what the general topic would be.

    Anyway, you can also use the Google Webmaster Tools to tell Google which domain to prefer.

    In theory (that is to say, when I’m not too lazy or too distracted), I 301 everything to the non-WWW domain because it takes longer to say the WWW than the whole rest of the domain.

    I’ve seen big companies not available without WWW. Recently tried to go to the ASUS site (I think) because I got a new computer and needed updated drivers for the motherboard. I literally got a “Directory Listing Denied” for http://asus.com. I can’t believe that a TECH company could be so dumb.

    Just curious, but why keep the WWW? Whim or do you actually have a reason.

  51. It is a part of the evolution. When webpages first came into public view in 1995/1996 you hat to type http:// to differentiate http, ftp and Telnet sessions (among others IRC…)

    Then it was http://www.abcdefg.com
    Now many companies just use abcdefg.com

    Now it seems we are more and more about subdirectories, redirects, and flash “applications”. It is getting to be a bit of a mess in some ways and in others more versatile.

    I like the shortest address with the best landing page combination. I am a big believer in using special landing pages for emails and so on. It helps to track performance.

    As for SEO – getting to be too much trouble to keep up with the changing shifting sands. Do good, write well, and be interesting. People will find you.

  52. It is a part of the evolution. When webpages first came into public view in 1995/1996 you hat to type http:// to differentiate http, ftp and Telnet sessions (among others IRC…)

    Then it was http://www.abcdefg.com
    Now many companies just use abcdefg.com

    Now it seems we are more and more about subdirectories, redirects, and flash “applications”. It is getting to be a bit of a mess in some ways and in others more versatile.

    I like the shortest address with the best landing page combination. I am a big believer in using special landing pages for emails and so on. It helps to track performance.

    As for SEO – getting to be too much trouble to keep up with the changing shifting sands. Do good, write well, and be interesting. People will find you.

  53. I don’t understand. I can get to my blog by typing either stresstopower.com/blog or http://www.stresstopower.com/blog. What am I missing?

  54. I don’t understand. I can get to my blog by typing either stresstopower.com/blog or http://www.stresstopower.com/blog. What am I missing?

  55. I, like you, redirected my non-www blog address to the www version. Out of habit, I generally don’t use the www but when I first set up my blog on Typepad, the non-www version took me instead to GoDaddy.com and said that the domain was “parked” there. I honestly didn’t give which direction to go much thought; just wanted the URL to work both ways.

  56. I, like you, redirected my non-www blog address to the www version. Out of habit, I generally don’t use the www but when I first set up my blog on Typepad, the non-www version took me instead to GoDaddy.com and said that the domain was “parked” there. I honestly didn’t give which direction to go much thought; just wanted the URL to work both ways.

  57. I think the “right” way to do it is to pick one (www or no-www) and redirect the other via a 301. This is “best practice”.

    Though for larger, more established sites, the search engines eventually figure out that both sites are aliases of each other (and this can also be specified through things like Google Webmaster Tools), there’s no upside to not being explicit about it via a 301.

    This is one of the things that The Website Grader, http://www.websitegrader.com, checks for.

  58. I think the “right” way to do it is to pick one (www or no-www) and redirect the other via a 301. This is “best practice”.

    Though for larger, more established sites, the search engines eventually figure out that both sites are aliases of each other (and this can also be specified through things like Google Webmaster Tools), there’s no upside to not being explicit about it via a 301.

    This is one of the things that The Website Grader, http://www.websitegrader.com, checks for.

  59. Oddly enough I don’t “WWW” on my personal site but I do on my personal finance site.

    The pf site is older by about 6-7 months and at the time I didn’t really think about it. When I set up my personal blog, I went without the WWW. Although I just entered it in and realized I must not have set up the redirect, need to do that!

  60. Oddly enough I don’t “WWW” on my personal site but I do on my personal finance site.

    The pf site is older by about 6-7 months and at the time I didn’t really think about it. When I set up my personal blog, I went without the WWW. Although I just entered it in and realized I must not have set up the redirect, need to do that!

  61. I exclude the WWW from my site, but we are currently hosting on a friend’s server, so the URL is already too long. I would have to say though, in a month or so when we have set up our server, I think we will still not use the WWWs, for he exact reason the article said: Because they’re not needed.

    Then again, what happens when you say “google.com” instead of “www.google.com”? Do all browsers add the http:// ?

  62. I exclude the WWW from my site, but we are currently hosting on a friend’s server, so the URL is already too long. I would have to say though, in a month or so when we have set up our server, I think we will still not use the WWWs, for he exact reason the article said: Because they’re not needed.

    Then again, what happens when you say “google.com” instead of “www.google.com”? Do all browsers add the http:// ?

  63. I don’t WWW. Personally, I’m too lazy to type it in my browser. 😉 So far, it has had no negative effects on my blog SEO-wise.

  64. I don’t WWW. Personally, I’m too lazy to type it in my browser. 😉 So far, it has had no negative effects on my blog SEO-wise.

  65. I www. I think it makes a lot of sense to redirect to one or the other, and I like using the www.

  66. I www. I think it makes a lot of sense to redirect to one or the other, and I like using the www.

  67. Yes, I WWW because on my machine, if I don’t- I am redirected to Google’s search engine. No WWW does not always work as planned in IE 7 given the options available.

  68. Yes, I WWW because on my machine, if I don’t- I am redirected to Google’s search engine. No WWW does not always work as planned in IE 7 given the options available.

  69. I do a bit of both actually as well. Normally i prefer the www version because i think most of the general public is used to it and it helps with branding.

  70. I do a bit of both actually as well. Normally i prefer the www version because i think most of the general public is used to it and it helps with branding.

  71. I just recently redirected my NO www addresses to the one WITH www. I don’t know why I did it in that direction and not the other….

    I have noticed that many UK URL’s are dead unless you type the www. How odd that their web people wouldn’t fix that.

  72. I just recently redirected my NO www addresses to the one WITH www. I don’t know why I did it in that direction and not the other….

    I have noticed that many UK URL’s are dead unless you type the www. How odd that their web people wouldn’t fix that.

  73. Nope. I always configure my new sites so that the WWW is not used, and that those trying to use it will be redirected to the non-WWW address. It makes the URI look neater, it’s shorter for everyone to type… I really don’t understand why *anyone* would still use it in this day and age for any other reason than tradition.

  74. Nope. I always configure my new sites so that the WWW is not used, and that those trying to use it will be redirected to the non-WWW address. It makes the URI look neater, it’s shorter for everyone to type… I really don’t understand why *anyone* would still use it in this day and age for any other reason than tradition.

  75. I’ve been removing the www on all my sites for quite a while now. Domain names seem to be getting longer either because the good short ones are taken or I’m trying to stuff keywords in them. Including the www just makes the length problem worse.

    The shorter version is more memorable and less prone to typos so it can often be more usable.

    I always use .htaccess to rewrite the www version to the shorter version. You can also use Google’s webmaster tools to specify which way you prefer your site to be referenced. I think it’s important to do so from an SEO perspective because people will continue to link to you with the www out of habit.

  76. I’ve been removing the www on all my sites for quite a while now. Domain names seem to be getting longer either because the good short ones are taken or I’m trying to stuff keywords in them. Including the www just makes the length problem worse.

    The shorter version is more memorable and less prone to typos so it can often be more usable.

    I always use .htaccess to rewrite the www version to the shorter version. You can also use Google’s webmaster tools to specify which way you prefer your site to be referenced. I think it’s important to do so from an SEO perspective because people will continue to link to you with the www out of habit.

  77. I just installed this plugin to make sure the www stays, but it can also ensure no www too. It also makes redirects to non slash pages to have the slash at the end, should help with duplicate content. So far it seems to work awesome, and since I could not get the .htaccess to ever work I am grateful.

    www redirect plugin

  78. I just installed this plugin to make sure the www stays, but it can also ensure no www too. It also makes redirects to non slash pages to have the slash at the end, should help with duplicate content. So far it seems to work awesome, and since I could not get the .htaccess to ever work I am grateful.

    www redirect plugin

  79. I’m going to check this out right now, and if I haven’t already I’m going to configure my .htaccess right now.

  80. I’m going to check this out right now, and if I haven’t already I’m going to configure my .htaccess right now.

  81. Its certainly does cause a problem, often referred to as URL Canonicalisation (Canonicalization). The SEO ‘issue’ people have is less about duplicate content, as its unlikely Google does not factor these matters into its algo, however by allowing Google to index both with www. and without, you are confusing Google and forcing them to choose the most relevant page to rank, meaning in some cases they may choose the wrong URL.

    For example without the URL a specific page on your site may have 1 inbound link, but with www. that page could have 100 links and therefore be much more deserving of being the chosen URL.

    Both URL’s will not rank for the same term, so its essential that prevenative measures are put in place.

    With or without http://www., it really does’nt matter, i personally often opt for with, but there is no benefit or disadvantage in doing so.

    I recently wrote a post on how to avoid URL canonicalisation, your readers may be interested in it.

  82. Its certainly does cause a problem, often referred to as URL Canonicalisation (Canonicalization). The SEO ‘issue’ people have is less about duplicate content, as its unlikely Google does not factor these matters into its algo, however by allowing Google to index both with www. and without, you are confusing Google and forcing them to choose the most relevant page to rank, meaning in some cases they may choose the wrong URL.

    For example without the URL a specific page on your site may have 1 inbound link, but with www. that page could have 100 links and therefore be much more deserving of being the chosen URL.

    Both URL’s will not rank for the same term, so its essential that prevenative measures are put in place.

    With or without http://www., it really does’nt matter, i personally often opt for with, but there is no benefit or disadvantage in doing so.

    I recently wrote a post on how to avoid URL canonicalisation, your readers may be interested in it.

  83. I generally don’t use www. when typing URLs, and if I share out my address I drop the www. However, I haven’t set anything to indicate that the two URLs (www.akamike.net and just akamike.net) are the same, since I actually didn’t realize it was such a big issue!

    Thanks for this post, this is definately something I am going to look into now. 🙂

  84. I generally don’t use www. when typing URLs, and if I share out my address I drop the www. However, I haven’t set anything to indicate that the two URLs (www.akamike.net and just akamike.net) are the same, since I actually didn’t realize it was such a big issue!

    Thanks for this post, this is definately something I am going to look into now. 🙂

  85. Either www or no-www is important because most of the internet user are still using www. Here, (I’m living in Thailand), if people wants to tell their web site address to other people even they say “world wide web”. So difficult to change the habit in this case. One thing I like no-www is that it can safe typing time at least one second 😉

  86. Either www or no-www is important because most of the internet user are still using www. Here, (I’m living in Thailand), if people wants to tell their web site address to other people even they say “world wide web”. So difficult to change the habit in this case. One thing I like no-www is that it can safe typing time at least one second 😉

  87. It is important to choose one or the other. Which one you choose is less important. WordPress has a plugin, which is great. But if you don’t have WordPress or you don’t even have a blog, do the redirect to your web site.

    The no www crowd can be pleased that their URL will take up less space on business cards and the rest of their collateral, which can be important.

    As long as the redirect is in place, it does not matter whether the visitor types in the www or not, they will still go to the web site address that you specify in the redirect. So, there is little need for the discussion about how much typing you are saving your visitors by choosing non www.

    It has more to do with what the visitor sees in the URL window of the browser.

    As Jordan mentioned above, the point about Google (and other SEs)needing to be told which URL to index is an important point.

    When you don’t redirect:
    If most of your inbound links have www and Google chooses the non www to index, you just lost the value those links.

    When you redirect, you get them back. Time to celebrate.

    You may also choose to reverse your redirect in the future. Never tried this, but don’t anticipate a problem. Anyone every done this?

  88. It is important to choose one or the other. Which one you choose is less important. WordPress has a plugin, which is great. But if you don’t have WordPress or you don’t even have a blog, do the redirect to your web site.

    The no www crowd can be pleased that their URL will take up less space on business cards and the rest of their collateral, which can be important.

    As long as the redirect is in place, it does not matter whether the visitor types in the www or not, they will still go to the web site address that you specify in the redirect. So, there is little need for the discussion about how much typing you are saving your visitors by choosing non www.

    It has more to do with what the visitor sees in the URL window of the browser.

    As Jordan mentioned above, the point about Google (and other SEs)needing to be told which URL to index is an important point.

    When you don’t redirect:
    If most of your inbound links have www and Google chooses the non www to index, you just lost the value those links.

    When you redirect, you get them back. Time to celebrate.

    You may also choose to reverse your redirect in the future. Never tried this, but don’t anticipate a problem. Anyone every done this?

  89. After over 12 years in the tech/web industry I have found many people type www. as a habit because the think that is the only way the internet works. I make sure things are setup to work both ways.

    Also, if you need to change the .htaccess file and you don’t know what you are doing you are better off contacting your web hosting provider. I know mine has been great to accommodate minor changes because it prevents them having to clean up a bigger mess later not to mention down time for your site.

  90. After over 12 years in the tech/web industry I have found many people type www. as a habit because the think that is the only way the internet works. I make sure things are setup to work both ways.

    Also, if you need to change the .htaccess file and you don’t know what you are doing you are better off contacting your web hosting provider. I know mine has been great to accommodate minor changes because it prevents them having to clean up a bigger mess later not to mention down time for your site.

  91. I got rid of the WWW’s months ago when a PR checker gave me a 4 for the non-www and a 2 for the www, as it really illustrated just how the 2 versions are treated as 2 separate domains.

    I wen the .htaccess route which was simple enough.

  92. I got rid of the WWW’s months ago when a PR checker gave me a 4 for the non-www and a 2 for the www, as it really illustrated just how the 2 versions are treated as 2 separate domains.

    I wen the .htaccess route which was simple enough.

  93. For my personal blog, I dont see the difference for a www but for business and organisational websites, i go for www seeing people are more used to it and it looks a bit better.

    and of course you need to use that plugin you mentioned, even if it doesnt make any change to your pagerank..

  94. For my personal blog, I dont see the difference for a www but for business and organisational websites, i go for www seeing people are more used to it and it looks a bit better.

    and of course you need to use that plugin you mentioned, even if it doesnt make any change to your pagerank..

  95. I don’t know if it will help anyone, but I figured out the problem. I’m running Drupal and have the main site setup in a subdirectory. I therefore had to put an .htaccess file in the top level directory to sort out the main domain and another one in the subdirectory. I fixed my problem by changing the rewriterule to:

    RewriteRule ^(.*) http://how-to-box.com/boxing/$1 [R=301,L]

  96. I don’t know if it will help anyone, but I figured out the problem. I’m running Drupal and have the main site setup in a subdirectory. I therefore had to put an .htaccess file in the top level directory to sort out the main domain and another one in the subdirectory. I fixed my problem by changing the rewriterule to:

    RewriteRule ^(.*) http://how-to-box.com/boxing/$1 [R=301,L]

  97. I am a no-WWW zealot. I have given my reason for my anti-WWW policy in this article http://bloggingbits.com/wordpress-permalinks-seo/

  98. I am a no-WWW zealot. I have given my reason for my anti-WWW policy in this article http://bloggingbits.com/wordpress-permalinks-seo/