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10 Lessons Comic Books Can Teach Us About Blogging and Content Marketing

comic-books

I nearly called this article “Everything I know about blogging I learned from comic books” but I was afraid too many people would take it literally, ha. In fact, there might be an element of truth to it. My formative reading material was dominated by muscly, spandex-clad guys and gals fighting crime and shooting laser beams out of their eyes. Like most geeks who grew up in the 1980s, I have been heavily influenced by Marvel, 2000AD/Judge Dredd, and to a lesser extend, DC comics.

Other than the odd graphic novel purchase, my interest was put to one side due to time, family, and so on. Recently though, due to the Marvel iPhone app, I have a renewed interest in buying comic books. This has made me look at them with a new perspective and I realised just how much content creators can learn from these publishers, writers and artists. As Stan Lee would say … excelsior!

  1. Excitement & Anticipation – Comics are all about capturing interest, building and maintaining it. When you get to the end of each issue, what is there? That’s right … a cliff-hanger! Want to know what happens next? Look out for the next issue. Fans look forward to the next new comic, they devour it, discuss it, swap it, then look forward to the next. And on and on! Even when re-issuing older archive stuff, like on the iPhone app, they still serialize the content and make you wait. Why? It builds anticipation and means you will buy a piece at a time.
    Lesson: Build anticipation, tell your audience the great stuff that is coming, drip-feed content, syndicate, and make sure you deliver on those promises.
  2. Visual impact – Half or more of the joy of comics is in the visuals. In fact, you don’t actually need the words a lot of the time to follow the story. Comic book artists are masters at telling a story visually and making everything that much more compelling. Combined with the occasionally really great plot (Dark Knight, Watchmen), this makes the medium really engaging and addictive.
    Lesson: Don’t rely on a wall of text. Spice up your content with visuals. Rather than try to describe everything, use illustrations and visual guides. This aids learning and consumption, which means your content will be far more successful.
  3. Cross-selling – Comic books are experts at cross-selling. It’s not just in the comic book store or full page ads within the comics, it is actually in the content. One thing lots of people notice when getting more involved in reading comics is buying one series is not enough to get the full story. First there are usually years of back story, inside jokes, plot twists, but then while one plot line is taking place, the rest of the story is unfolding in sister comics, for example “* See Avengers #517″. That is a strong enough pull for many a fan to discover new characters, series, artists, and so-on, but for the truly addicted collector, it never ends.
    Lesson
    : Where another piece of content or product is relevant, mention it. Keep adding and creating more relevant content or products while the demand is strong. Predict what people will want, need next and deliver it. Create an environment where a customer can discover more of your great stuff.
  4. Human Drama – The stories in these comics never stay still, and while much of the action is crude (people fighting or spoiling for a fight), they also have the power to move you. We feel involved, we want to know what happens because we care. Although based in science fiction or fantasy, the drama is most importantly human. Peter Parker was a bullied school kid who, yes, got bitten by a radiactive spider, but also had relationship problems, career issues, and suffered loss. The Hulk is profoundly lonely. And so on. The web is now very much social, which is about people. People engage with people, they connect with the person over the brand. Especially important if you are a non-profit, the human-interest story is your key to making connections.
    Lesson: Bring your content alive, show humanity, connect on a personal level. A lot of the time drama is actually something people in business distance from. We seem to relate drama with emotional instability. But people want and like drama when it is the right kind. Drama might not be your thing, but the point is about discovering ways to lift your content, from adding a simple joke with a surprising punchline through to colorful, lively, engrossing stories.
  5. Longevity – How many characters and storylines can continue decades? Even in Television long-lived stories are rare, but in comics it is pretty much the norm. Superman has been around for generations, in print, radio, TV and film. All the ingredients mentioned here have counted towards that, but in addition they are always moving with the times, changing, evolving, testing, trying new things, but not breaking their core.
    Lesson: Don’t be afraid to experiment but keep true to what your audience and customers love you for. You will be rewarded with loyalty.
  6. Customer-focus – Following from the last point, these brands still exist because they have the customer in mind with every decision. Yes, there have been times when they have stepped out of line. The fans can be cruel in their vocal reactions sometimes. But these publishers and writers know how to correct their mistakes, know what the audience likes and they give it to them, and because of that are forgiven when their experiments fall flat. Most started out as fans before getting into the industry. They are still fans many of them. Conventions, workshops and meetups allow the industry and fans to get together, plus now more than ever the customers have a voice that can be heard loud and clear.
    Lesson: Keep in tune with your audience and customers. Know what they are thinking. Let them know you are listening. Deliver what they really want, take chances, and don’t be afraid to surprise your audience (in a good way).
  7. Brand management -  I have mentioned a few times that the comic book publishers really know their audience, but are willing to experiment. A couple of times I also mentioned brands. The characters and series are brands, and they are much-loved (to the point of obsession occasionally) brands at that. This means there is a delicate balance between pushing the boundaries while also staying true.
    Lesson: Knowing what the brand really means to people is vital, and making sure you stay consistent and do not betray the promises you set up.
  8. Skimming and Sound bites - As well as visuals, these stories are told in sound bites. Unlike a novel, there are very few words used to convey the story, with most of it dialog (even internal dialog). Short, clipped sentences, speech bubbles and information boxes. This means the stories can move fast and get across the information required very briefly. Perfect for distracted, excited, readers. This format also means that it is very repeatable and quotable. Characters develop catch phrases, which means playground word of mouth. Consumption is increased because a reader can get through several comics in one sitting.
    Lesson
    : If you want to get your point across quickly and not lose your reader’s interest, make your content into compact and easy to consume. Use lots of quotes, images and sound bites.
  9. Multiple media – As mentioned above, once a character gets a following you can expect to see it everywhere from action figures all the way through to the big screen. The fans watch them, read them and wear them. You can even read the comics on computer, or on your phone.
    Lesson
    : Be where your customers are and in the format your customers want. Try video, audio, print, ebooks, long and short formats.
  10. Repurposing – As content owners we often create something then let it rot, even though a lot of what we produce is evergreen. Not so with comics. Initially comics are serialised weekly, fortnightly or monthly, but then there will be collected comics, specials, repeats, graphic novels, re-issues, and as mentioned above, storylines are recycled into other media. You can even subscribe for an all you can eat plan online for $60 a year over at Marvel.com (which I am tempted to do, although I can’t understand why they don’t extend that pricing to the iPhone …).
    Lesson: Be on the look out for how you can repurpose your existing content in new ways. Perhaps republish an article, extract a bonus from a product and sell it, or bundle up content into an ebook?

As is traditional, I stopped at #10 :) Were or are you a comics fan? Which? What have I missed? Do you agree or disagree with any items? Does this give you any ideas? Please share your thoughts in the comments …

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Comments

  1. Chris this is an excellent post – I can resonate as I too was growing up during the 80′s and 90′s reading the same comics as you.

    I actually found the most enjoyment from reading the 2000AD and Dark Horse comics – specifically the Grendel, Durham Red, ABC Warriors and Strontium Dog. Dredd was always last for me, for some reason. I just felt his character was a little 1 dimensional.

    I’ve never thought about comics in relation to marketing to this extent and so this has been hugely insightful for me.

    Thank you!

  2. Chris this is an excellent post – I can resonate as I too was growing up during the 80′s and 90′s reading the same comics as you.

    I actually found the most enjoyment from reading the 2000AD and Dark Horse comics – specifically the Grendel, Durham Red, ABC Warriors and Strontium Dog. Dredd was always last for me, for some reason. I just felt his character was a little 1 dimensional.

    I’ve never thought about comics in relation to marketing to this extent and so this has been hugely insightful for me.

    Thank you!

  3. Love those tips – i guess not just blogs but almost every other thing can learn from this.

  4. Hey Chris,

    I grew up reading comic books: Spiderman, Avengers, Fantastic Four and a few others, and I can’t help but be a little enthusiastic about your fun list.

    I particularly appreciated the cross-selling aspect of articles that has helped me see a big number in page views per visit, which is certainly a goal.

  5. Love those tips – i guess not just blogs but almost every other thing can learn from this.

  6. Hey Chris,

    I grew up reading comic books: Spiderman, Avengers, Fantastic Four and a few others, and I can’t help but be a little enthusiastic about your fun list.

    I particularly appreciated the cross-selling aspect of articles that has helped me see a big number in page views per visit, which is certainly a goal.

  7. Hi Chris, this was the perfect post for me to read today – I’m working with a friend on a strategy for a new blog we’re putting together and what you wrote beautifully summed up what we want to do.

    Not sure why, but reading someone else say exactly what you were thinking is very invigorating.

    I’ve never been a comic book fan, but it’s amazing to see how my 5 and 7 year olds can have an in depth conversation with their father and his friends about Spiderman and Batman! I don’t know that blogs easily lend themselves to this multi-generational approach, but it is good to note that your audience will expand over time.

    Repurposing posts is a great way to make sure those new readers can benefit from the best you have to offer while continuing to offer older readers new posts of value.

  8. Hi Chris, this was the perfect post for me to read today – I’m working with a friend on a strategy for a new blog we’re putting together and what you wrote beautifully summed up what we want to do.

    Not sure why, but reading someone else say exactly what you were thinking is very invigorating.

    I’ve never been a comic book fan, but it’s amazing to see how my 5 and 7 year olds can have an in depth conversation with their father and his friends about Spiderman and Batman! I don’t know that blogs easily lend themselves to this multi-generational approach, but it is good to note that your audience will expand over time.

    Repurposing posts is a great way to make sure those new readers can benefit from the best you have to offer while continuing to offer older readers new posts of value.

  9. Not a comicbook fan but do value your post’s content!

    I’m interested in repurposing existing content – “perhaps republish an article”. Have you written anything on this in another post?

    Thanks!

  10. Not a comicbook fan but do value your post’s content!

    I’m interested in repurposing existing content – “perhaps republish an article”. Have you written anything on this in another post?

    Thanks!

  11. This is a perfect analogy and yes, I can remember waiting each week for my 50 cent allowance so I could run down to the corner drugstore on Sacramento Street in San Francisco with my sister to buy the latest issue of Archie or Richie Rich (I’m a girl; what can I say). We’d spend a lot of time deciding who bought which comic (determined by which one we wanted to read first) and then buy mint julep candies with the change. (I’m also dating myself here.)

    Today’s blog is a keeper!

  12. This is a perfect analogy and yes, I can remember waiting each week for my 50 cent allowance so I could run down to the corner drugstore on Sacramento Street in San Francisco with my sister to buy the latest issue of Archie or Richie Rich (I’m a girl; what can I say). We’d spend a lot of time deciding who bought which comic (determined by which one we wanted to read first) and then buy mint julep candies with the change. (I’m also dating myself here.)

    Today’s blog is a keeper!

  13. Hey Chris,

    I really loved this post! While I did not buy comic books, my dad has an old collection and I did read his (when he would let me). I did look forward to the comics section in the Sunday newspaper edition in my early years and always wanted to know what my favorites were up to next week!

    Great new slant on blogging/marketing/branding! Keep up the great work!!

    Kim

  14. Hey Chris,

    I really loved this post! While I did not buy comic books, my dad has an old collection and I did read his (when he would let me). I did look forward to the comics section in the Sunday newspaper edition in my early years and always wanted to know what my favorites were up to next week!

    Great new slant on blogging/marketing/branding! Keep up the great work!!

    Kim

  15. Something else we can learn is that the comics take you on a journey, sometimes (without knowing it) you feel like you are the hero.

    Learning from the story-telling in the comics will also help you sell your product or idea, especially if you can make your prospects see themselves as the hero,

  16. Thanks Chris …

    Always been a comic geek, (still am but to a lesser extent!), so I really feel I grabbed the points here, (well they grabbed me!) Repurposing isn’t a new idea to me but I loved the parallel of “Human Drama” and making our content alive & personal. Connecting at this level is something I’m experimenting with, (sure there’s some re-written material on my blog, but there’s as much personal stuff I hope!)

    You’ve given me some inspiration to tackle my own blog again … damn, now all I need do is contend & defeat the procrastination monster! ;-)

  17. Something else we can learn is that the comics take you on a journey, sometimes (without knowing it) you feel like you are the hero.

    Learning from the story-telling in the comics will also help you sell your product or idea, especially if you can make your prospects see themselves as the hero,

  18. Thanks Chris …

    Always been a comic geek, (still am but to a lesser extent!), so I really feel I grabbed the points here, (well they grabbed me!) Repurposing isn’t a new idea to me but I loved the parallel of “Human Drama” and making our content alive & personal. Connecting at this level is something I’m experimenting with, (sure there’s some re-written material on my blog, but there’s as much personal stuff I hope!)

    You’ve given me some inspiration to tackle my own blog again … damn, now all I need do is contend & defeat the procrastination monster! ;-)

  19. Hey Chris!

    You grew up in the 80′s? Goodness I’m getting old :(

    As a child growing up in the 60′s and 70′s I was super addicted to comics. Spiderman and Fantastic Four were my drugs of choice. The addiction has made it through to present day for me – although I’ve scaled back and switched to DC Comics and The Green Lantern.

    A lesson learned from my experience is that although my audience likes certain things – and will stick by them – they also, like you said, need to be presented with new opportunities. Thus me moving from Marvel to DC in my focus.

    I made this move because I realized that there was good stuff “on the other side of the fence”.

    If we are open to try new things – I’m willing to be that a loyal following will try then as well.

    Great post!

  20. Hey Chris!

    You grew up in the 80′s? Goodness I’m getting old :(

    As a child growing up in the 60′s and 70′s I was super addicted to comics. Spiderman and Fantastic Four were my drugs of choice. The addiction has made it through to present day for me – although I’ve scaled back and switched to DC Comics and The Green Lantern.

    A lesson learned from my experience is that although my audience likes certain things – and will stick by them – they also, like you said, need to be presented with new opportunities. Thus me moving from Marvel to DC in my focus.

    I made this move because I realized that there was good stuff “on the other side of the fence”.

    If we are open to try new things – I’m willing to be that a loyal following will try then as well.

    Great post!

  21. Not only do you learn from reading comics, but you can also start to see your life unfolding at webcomics when you read them. I can SO see my son saying the following: http://www.nicky510.com/comic/quite-the-balancing-act/ :)

  22. Not only do you learn from reading comics, but you can also start to see your life unfolding at webcomics when you read them. I can SO see my son saying the following: http://www.nicky510.com/comic/quite-the-balancing-act/ :)

  23. Big time comic reader when I was a kid. I was into almost all of them both DC and Marvel. Collected them for potential profits when I grew up, however when I grew up I found that they didn’t really appreciate much. I sold about half of them 8 years ago, the others are just collecting dust in a couple of boxes in my house.

    The one thing I think you might have overlooked is what you can learn from the ads that were in comic books. They used scarcity, bonuses, proof, outrageous headlines, USP, etc. All of the fundamentals that still work today to sell.

    Fun read…

  24. Big time comic reader when I was a kid. I was into almost all of them both DC and Marvel. Collected them for potential profits when I grew up, however when I grew up I found that they didn’t really appreciate much. I sold about half of them 8 years ago, the others are just collecting dust in a couple of boxes in my house.

    The one thing I think you might have overlooked is what you can learn from the ads that were in comic books. They used scarcity, bonuses, proof, outrageous headlines, USP, etc. All of the fundamentals that still work today to sell.

    Fun read…

  25. I grew up reading Spawn, X-Men, Spidey, Batman, and about 50 others. I love the new Marvel app, and I’m glad I found a way to get back into comics and to share them with my son.

  26. I grew up reading Spawn, X-Men, Spidey, Batman, and about 50 others. I love the new Marvel app, and I’m glad I found a way to get back into comics and to share them with my son.

  27. Awesome Chris, what a brilliant analogy,

    I’m a huge fan of comic books – I*m an otaku – and all your points make complete sense. There’s so much to learn from these graphic masterpieces, although I have to say that Japanese comics are playing the game way better nowadays.

    And How about word perception –
    comic books are for children,
    graphic novels are for adults
    Same thing, different branding=different demography

  28. Awesome Chris, what a brilliant analogy,

    I’m a huge fan of comic books – I*m an otaku – and all your points make complete sense. There’s so much to learn from these graphic masterpieces, although I have to say that Japanese comics are playing the game way better nowadays.

    And How about word perception –
    comic books are for children,
    graphic novels are for adults
    Same thing, different branding=different demography

  29. Good cross-analysis of blogging and comics.

    I learned to read with a Bugs Bunny comic in the early 50′s and have gotten addicted to hero comics several times, every thing from Batman and Thor and Doc Savage through the JLA and Punisher and most recently the Sandman graphic novels.

    I love the iconography of these; the short, to-the-point messages that keep you involved; and the feeling that you have been invited to share the life of the character.

  30. remarkablogger says:

    I love this comparison (but then I'm a nerd too). Comics really are soap operas for nerds (at least in Western culture, in Eastern culture manga is for everyone, not just otaku).

    One way to create “cliffhangers” on your blog is to write a series of posts and build anticipation for the next post in each one you publish. This helps you grow subscribers, too.

  31. chrisgarrett says:

    Yay, you are officially my first Disqus powered commenter – huzzah!

    Yup, show people there is a reason why they should come back!

  32. Great comparison Chris and I think applicable to other parts of life besides blogging too. Often people disregard comics as “for kids” when they're really another way of telling stories and can be very involving and personally relevant – much like a blog can be. Sure we love it when the hero does their heroic thing, but the small interpersonal moments are often more dramatic, to me at least.

  33. chrisgarrett says:

    I think the small moments make us care about the big ones. It's why I ask my clients to put personal anecdotes into their blogs because it makes them believable as people and therefore easier to connect with.

  34. This is a great burst of fresh perspective on my blogging. And for some reason I have an urge to dig through my basement to find those old Spiderman and Incredible Hulk comics.

    The drama (story-telling) and skimming and sound-bites is where I'm going to focus my efforts.

    Funny–I unintentionally did a cliffhanger on my blog today.

    Thanks Chris – Good stuff!

  35. chrisgarrett says:

    Sometimes unintentional cliffhangers are the best, because natural often works better than forcing it :)

  36. Chris,

    WOW! Been a long time reader of the emails that pop into my inbox but I just had to comment. This is one of the most original posts I've read! I kinda thought it'd be gimmicky and superficial but each “lesson” is actually very well integrated with the comic examples! I love it!

    Also, have you seen “Kick Ass”?! Freakin' amazing movie. LOL I think you'd like it!

  37. chrisgarrett says:

    Thanks, that is very kind :)

    I have been meaning to see Kick Ass but it is not child friendly so have some logistics to work out :)

  38. Brand managing & real life events on blogs can make interesting contents for readers.Thanks for letting us know.

  39. This is a great list!

    From my experience so far, *executing* on these notions is *hard*! At least, when you're just starting out.

    Currently I have several open threads, but I haven't revisited any of them in a couple of months. This is a good reminder to do so.

    It's interesting too that just as characters in comics “die” so to do bloggers! I've had an intermittent story line running with one person, who has up and very publicly quit. So much for that story.

  40. chrisgarrett says:

    You're welcome :)

  41. chrisgarrett says:

    Lots of people quit blogging, but just as characters go, sometimes they come back :)

  42. I was a big comic fan in the past. I remember my grandparents giving me $100 for a birthday when I was a teen. I immediately headed to the comic book store and bought Giant Size X-Men #1. (It was $65 then and I found plenty to buy with with the other $35.)

    Repurposing is something I'm doing more of.

    The blog articles have become a free book download, they'll be going to an article bank, and I've started putting them into an iTunes podcast as well as inching my way into a YouTube channel.

    It's the same content (pretty-much), but placed in different places where people you wouldn't expect my “trip” over me.

    If you wrote it, you might as well have it pull extra duty for you.

    (I'm one of the people who has done the Marvel online subscription. If DC would do it, too, I'd be a happy camper.)

  43. Hi Chris

    Fantastic post. Its wonderful to see someone taking comics seriously and extending the discussion about their usefulness.

    I’m a comic geek. I have also been studying adult learning for most of the past decade. A couple of years ago someone pointed out Scott McCloud’s book “Understanding Comics”. Ever since I have been using comics to help people understand financial mathematics and IT project management. You can find some examples at http://www.decision-coach.com

    The comic book is a learning professionals dream.

  44. chrisgarrett says:

    Exactly, put your content out where people will find it and in the format they most like to engage with :)

    My only problem with the online subscription is it is flash, so doesn't work on iPhone (hence the app I guess, but no subscription on that ) and you can't download to take it on flights :(

  45. chrisgarrett says:

    The artwork in 2000AD was awesome, I actually preferred it to that generation of Marvel comics, though the Marvel characters and series had the edge for me (Spiderman, Iron Man, Secret Wars, X-Men etc). With Dredd I actually preferred Judge Anderson and Judge Death stories :)

  46. chrisgarrett says:

    Thanks :)

  47. chrisgarrett says:

    Cross-marketing is huge because if someone likes one part then there is a good chance they will like the rest :)

  48. chrisgarrett says:

    Just wait until those 5 and 7 year olds are teenagers! :)

    When you have a deep archive, especially series, the repurposing kind of jumps out at you :)

  49. chrisgarrett says:

    Can't think of one but I will write something :)

  50. chrisgarrett says:

    It amazes me the way prices have gone up, I was able to get comics AND candy out of my tiny allowance, now not only would my allowance have to be far bigger, kids expect far more than just a comic to be happy!

  51. chrisgarrett says:

    Thanks Kim :)

  52. chrisgarrett says:

    Great point – they put you right in the middle of the action so you can imagine yourself there – good sales material should make you feel you own the product and all the benefits etc you get from it

  53. chrisgarrett says:

    I have faced down the procrastination monster many times, that is a good example of a heroic battle right there ;)

  54. chrisgarrett says:

    I was born in 1974 so the 80's was my decade :)

    The DC versus Marvel example is a good one – it shows how people form “tribes” around brands, and how you can polarize. It is not just comics, my parents liked the Beatles, my in-laws liked Elvis, therefore my music tastes and my wife's are different.

    I loved the Superman and Batman characters in the films, and the odd graphic novel (Dark Knight, Killing Joke, etc), the Marvel universe and home-grown stuff had my loyalty. Some of the classic DC characters I only knew a little from doctors waiting rooms (Green Lantern stands out as an example) or TV (the flash). I did enjoy all of those but never fully bought into them. Wonder why?

    Even now I go to the Marvel section of the comic book store! Old habits …

  55. chrisgarrett says:

    Ha, cool. In terms of web comics I like xkcd, penny arcade, and of course I read Dilbert on the web too :)

  56. chrisgarrett says:

    Yes! I am glad I never succumbed to buying x-ray specs, sea monkeys and the body building systems ;)

  57. chrisgarrett says:

    The marvel app is awesome but I don't like the per comic pricing, I want the marvel.com subscription on my handheld – too much to ask? :)

    You grew up with Spawn? OMG, I think I was working when that came out (Todd McFarlane did wonders with the Spiderman franchise and was born in my birthplace, Calgary!)

  58. chrisgarrett says:

    Yeah, and some people see “comics” as being “funnies”. I have to say I do prefer graphic novel format because I like to get a whole storyline (impatient!).

    In terms of the Japanese stuff I didn't really get into it apart from the odd film I have seen, and the Japanese cartoon TV shows. Probably a good thing for my bank balance ;)

  59. GREAT post. Very inventive. I know that it's been really popular on twitter.

  60. Now you're really speaking my language, Chris. I read your posts with glee, followed along with the Mojo Marketing intro stuff and also take he Authority Blogger course (so clearly, your ideas work!), but I run a blog/website with multiple writers, not all of whom are “bloggers”, or have the desire to learn how to relationship blog. I'm always looking for ways to direct the content to still have those relationship/Authority traits….. and since I'm a giant comics nerd, I totally understand where you're coming from on this….! Thanks so much!

  61. chrisgarrett says:

    I definitely think comics are a great model to learn from if you want people to consume and understand your information. Unfortunately a lot of people look down their nose at comics as being infantile without seeing the wisdom in them.

  62. chrisgarrett says:

    I am a bit surprised actually, wasn't sure how well accepted it would be – not everyone admits to liking anything to do with comics :)

  63. chrisgarrett says:

    So glad to hear you like it, and especially you like the comics connection – there seem to be a lot more of us out there than I thought! :)

  64. Great article! Thank you.

  65. my two bit i think missed out one >>>CONTROVERSY make sure consumers keep on talking.

  66. Chris, if you owned all the comics at the top of this post, you could probably retire from blogging.

  67. chrisgarrett says:

    Nope … because I read comics, never collected them in little plastic bags ;)

  68. chrisgarrett says:

    Ah yes, good example in comic world is “death of superman … oop, false alarm!” ;)

  69. chrisgarrett says:

    Glad you liked it :)

  70. Hey Chris,
    What a refreshing, originally put and insightful piece! 10 excellent points! Thanks a lot for sharing.

    I'm actually a big comic book fan and collector – although the ones I'm referring to are the French Bande Dessinee (BD). Not sure if you're familiar with them but they're the larger, hard cover comics with unbelievable graphics and captivating stories. The ones I read and collect are usually not so funny but super interesting and well written. There's so much to learn from them especially when the story is based on historical/legendary real life characters.

    Anyways I don't mean to ramble about BD's/comics, but I just wanted to commend you on this wonderful post. It's always a pleasure reading your informative blog as well as learning from you! I look forward to your next article.

    Cheers

  71. Your edutainment skills really helped with this one.

    Comic books really had some of the best advertisements … from sea monkeys to X-Ray vision glasses. My Mom never believed the ads, but I did, and I bugged her until she got me the stuff … and of course it never lived up to expectations, but it sure was a thrill. I'm still waiting for my sea monkeys to get older and look like the ad.

  72. chrisgarrett says:

    Never seen those comics but I will definitely try to check them out :) (assuming they do them in English or translations are readily available!)

  73. chrisgarrett says:

    I used to like those ads but it is probably a good job I couldn't afford to buy anything from them!

  74. This was a post of brilliance Chris, while I didn't have comics as a kid (not being able to read will do that lol)

    I do buy my son all the Ben 10 comics which he loves and just like the old vintage stuff your talking here they actually have a lot of hidden 'morale' meaning behind the stories and plots.

    Excellent stuff here Chris!

  75. chrisgarrett says:

    My daughter likes my comics but we are only familiar with Ben 10 from the TV, we should check those out :)

  76. Yeah they are very good as is Star Wars Clone Wars, OK off to bury my head in geek father shame! lol

  77. SteveErrey says:

    Love it Chris

    I came to comic books kinda late, but have always loved the whole superhero ethos. I'd add the classic “With great power comes great responsibility” – you have something unique and powerful, it's your responsibility to use it in the best ways.

    I also love how the brands reboot themselves every so often. Marvel went through the Civil War series (which I love, others didn't) and are soon to reset so they can explore other story lines. They're not afraid to hit the reset button where it takes them in a new and exciting direction.

    Might not get much done today as I suddenly have the urge to read another Civil War graphic novel ;)

  78. Great post, Chris! I remember the cartoon series which I watched when I was a kid called Super Friends. Applying it to blogging, I think a blogger will achieve what he or she wants faster and easier if he or she has a bunch of “super blogger friends”. This is a team of pals you can count on, and which you give back, to give you support when you need it, be it tweets, comments, links, whatever.

  79. chrisgarrett says:

    I bought a couple of the civil war series but am glad they are now in the marvel.com subscription that I just signed up to. The invasion series was pretty cool too :)

  80. chrisgarrett says:

    Great point – I don't know where I would be without my team of superhero friends :)

  81. You NAILED this post! It's amazing that almost all blogging lessons can truly be learned from comic books. There is always power in story and when you use compelling story to illustrate your brand, you can be sure you're making an impact on your peers, readers, and target audience.

  82. chrisgarrett says:

    Thanks, and yup – the best comics and blogs are pure storytelling :)

  83. A great post like this is a rare sight in the blogging world!
    Will most definately try to use our tips

  84. Now I got an excuse to go buy some comics book to study them

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  86. Radu Prisacaru says:

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  87. HA! I love it lol! Especially the cross selling point.

  88. combatlondon says:

    Hi, about #3 cross selling,

    Don't you think as well that if a blog has many inside jokes and background story to it the new readers miss big deal of the blog and may not be attracted to come back. In print you assume engagement, time and dedication, but these all three lack in the website user…..
    What do you think?

  89. jvsrikrishna says:

    I think I would like to see “All Encompassing” on the list. Take the Justice League for instance. When Superman and Batman team up, its a gala event for the fans. Same thing for business models; the more the merrier. I personally think Skillocracy.com's success is a testament to this aspect. It is a great new website for freelancers that is a no-hassle and no-time-wasted website that allows freelancers' work speak for itself.

  90. Radu Prisacaru says:

    How long do you spend writing on your blog per month?