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Aweber Popup Email Subscription Form Test Results

For just over a week now I have been testing the Aweber “lightbox” popup email subscription form. I wrote about the experiment here, and now I wanted to share some results.

Aweber Email Subscriptions

Google Analytics Traffic for Same Period

As you can see when I placed the form up I actually got a small dip in subscriptions before it corrected to become an increase to eventually settling down to a 5.9% conversion rate, up from 2.4%. A client is trying it also and is getting a 5.5% conversion.

Why the dip? There is a weekend lull, but I looked at my analytics and I believe it is because of traffic source. Referral links and search traffic seems to convert much better than social media and my regular visitors.

Aweber Report Key

Aweber Report Key

What I need to keep my eye on is the unverified and the unsubscribes. It’s hard to tell at the moment but I think some of the people signing up were just looking for the freebies and nothing more.

Thing that surprises me is if you take a wider view, the results are not terribly dramatic:

30 Day Lead Growth Aweber Report

So what is the conclusion?

It’s worth a try for newer blogs to get that early momentum, and certainly others are gaining subscribers at a better rate, but for me I am not entirely convinced the results justify the damage to credibility and longevity.

I want my content to sell my subscription, and I want people to stay subscribed because they see value. Like I often say on this blog, it is not worth burning up your long term value for the sake of some short term gains.

To test this I am going to look at segmenting people who join via popup and see if there is a difference in engagement before trialling my alternative.

Make sure you subscribe so you don’t miss those results or what my alternative subscription idea is!

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Comments

  1. I saw the piece on Problogger when this idea was first mentioned, and I can tell you as a reader I find the pop-up completely obnoxious. Pop-ups will forever be associated with spam and porn, no matter how tastefully done.

    Looking forward to seeing the next subscription idea though! πŸ™‚

  2. I saw the piece on Problogger when this idea was first mentioned, and I can tell you as a reader I find the pop-up completely obnoxious. Pop-ups will forever be associated with spam and porn, no matter how tastefully done.

    Looking forward to seeing the next subscription idea though! πŸ™‚

  3. I’m still a little unsure about it, I have definitely got more people signed up to my list though.

    I’m considering now only showing it to visitors who come from search engines – they’re not likely to be loyal readers, but if I can get them to sign up to my email I might have a chance to convert them.

  4. I’m still a little unsure about it, I have definitely got more people signed up to my list though.

    I’m considering now only showing it to visitors who come from search engines – they’re not likely to be loyal readers, but if I can get them to sign up to my email I might have a chance to convert them.

  5. As you said this would be great for newbies trying to get early conversions. It would also be great for the bigger guns so they can see a spike in subscriptions. But having it there long term would frustrate the hell out of readers (note: I said long term) and could kill your credibility with a lot of people.
    Only use for short term I think

  6. As you said this would be great for newbies trying to get early conversions. It would also be great for the bigger guns so they can see a spike in subscriptions. But having it there long term would frustrate the hell out of readers (note: I said long term) and could kill your credibility with a lot of people.
    Only use for short term I think

  7. Chris, I have to confess I think this a terrible idea. Twice I came here looking for something and got stuck behind the pop up box. I couldn’t find a way to close it. My only options were a) sign up maybe with a false e-mail or b) click away. If it was less intrusive, or easier to squash, maybe, but I fear it will do more damage than good.

  8. Chris, I have to confess I think this a terrible idea. Twice I came here looking for something and got stuck behind the pop up box. I couldn’t find a way to close it. My only options were a) sign up maybe with a false e-mail or b) click away. If it was less intrusive, or easier to squash, maybe, but I fear it will do more damage than good.

  9. Chris, I have been watching with interest. I hate those pop-up windows myself. Therefore, why would I subject my readers to them?

    I was considering, however, using the feature as they leave my site. Have you tested that?

    It seems that it would be less intrusive then hitting them in the face when they first show up.

    If, after they have spent some time, on your blog, and THEN you ask them for a subscription, it might be more palatable.

    Perhaps something like: Thank you for spending some time @ Boomer in the Pew. I hope you enjoyed your visit. So that you might better become acquainted with our site, please join our weekly newsletter.

    It would be nice if the pop-up also offer the ability to sign up for the RSS Feed.

    Thoughts?

  10. Chris, I have been watching with interest. I hate those pop-up windows myself. Therefore, why would I subject my readers to them?

    I was considering, however, using the feature as they leave my site. Have you tested that?

    It seems that it would be less intrusive then hitting them in the face when they first show up.

    If, after they have spent some time, on your blog, and THEN you ask them for a subscription, it might be more palatable.

    Perhaps something like: Thank you for spending some time @ Boomer in the Pew. I hope you enjoyed your visit. So that you might better become acquainted with our site, please join our weekly newsletter.

    It would be nice if the pop-up also offer the ability to sign up for the RSS Feed.

    Thoughts?

  11. Chris,

    Very curious: What approach will you be taking to segment the people who joined via popup?

    John

  12. Chris,

    Very curious: What approach will you be taking to segment the people who joined via popup?

    John

  13. Thanks for sharing the result of your experiment. This is exactly the information that I was looking for when I posted the question on your forum. Most of my visitors are from social media at the moment so it probably doesn’t make sense to add the popup.

  14. I have always felt the same about pop ups and felt strongly that given the nature of my readers using one would not be useful.

    So…after reading Darren’s post I decided to do a week long split test. One version just had the standard name and e-mail box with “to subscribe fill in the box below”. The other had only the e-mail box with the same copy above. Right away I saw an small increase in readers signing up using the e-mail only box.

    The next test was also a 50/50 split one box had “To get regular updates please enter your e-mail address in the box below. The other box had the following along with my logo:

    The ARTISTScenter offers a free weekly newsletter with:

    * Tips for diversifying your market.
    * Focused articles on the most up to date market trends.
    * Tips on using the emerging marketing techniques to improve sales.
    * How to tips on everything from digital entries to automating your marketing.
    * The most most recent articles delivered to via RSS feed to your e-mail box

    This version generated almost double the opt-ins and continues to bring in more.

    I have it set to open once for the same viewer.

    My readers are not the most tech savvy and tend to be very guarded about giving out any info so I was surprised to see the results. This blog is also only about 3 mos old so that may have an effect.

    In addition to this I have opt-ins after every post and until recently in my sidebar. None of those have generated subscribers.
    I’ll test those similarly when I get time.

    I think some of your conclusions are right Chris and I think successful use of this tactic is really dependent on a lot of things not the least of which is a bloggers choice to use it.

  15. Thanks for sharing the result of your experiment. This is exactly the information that I was looking for when I posted the question on your forum. Most of my visitors are from social media at the moment so it probably doesn’t make sense to add the popup.

  16. I have always felt the same about pop ups and felt strongly that given the nature of my readers using one would not be useful.

    So…after reading Darren’s post I decided to do a week long split test. One version just had the standard name and e-mail box with “to subscribe fill in the box below”. The other had only the e-mail box with the same copy above. Right away I saw an small increase in readers signing up using the e-mail only box.

    The next test was also a 50/50 split one box had “To get regular updates please enter your e-mail address in the box below. The other box had the following along with my logo:

    The ARTISTScenter offers a free weekly newsletter with:

    * Tips for diversifying your market.
    * Focused articles on the most up to date market trends.
    * Tips on using the emerging marketing techniques to improve sales.
    * How to tips on everything from digital entries to automating your marketing.
    * The most most recent articles delivered to via RSS feed to your e-mail box

    This version generated almost double the opt-ins and continues to bring in more.

    I have it set to open once for the same viewer.

    My readers are not the most tech savvy and tend to be very guarded about giving out any info so I was surprised to see the results. This blog is also only about 3 mos old so that may have an effect.

    In addition to this I have opt-ins after every post and until recently in my sidebar. None of those have generated subscribers.
    I’ll test those similarly when I get time.

    I think some of your conclusions are right Chris and I think successful use of this tactic is really dependent on a lot of things not the least of which is a bloggers choice to use it.

  17. Chris, thank you for sharing your results.

    Yesterday, I inserted the light box pop up into one of my niche sites not in the MMO market. I full expect to get a better result than you did in this market.

    I have found that Internet Marketers and bloggers are more “hip” to the tips and tricks we all use in our business. However, the niche that I am using this pop up box is in a less tech savvy niche. Heck, even adsense works like a charm in this market as compared to MMO/Internet Marketing where it doesn’t really work.

    One other note, I only have the pop up box set to one time use, so I don’t piss off my current readers and destroy my long term credibility…., but we will see!

    Thanks again!

  18. Chris, thank you for sharing your results.

    Yesterday, I inserted the light box pop up into one of my niche sites not in the MMO market. I full expect to get a better result than you did in this market.

    I have found that Internet Marketers and bloggers are more “hip” to the tips and tricks we all use in our business. However, the niche that I am using this pop up box is in a less tech savvy niche. Heck, even adsense works like a charm in this market as compared to MMO/Internet Marketing where it doesn’t really work.

    One other note, I only have the pop up box set to one time use, so I don’t piss off my current readers and destroy my long term credibility…., but we will see!

    Thanks again!

  19. Very interesting thanks Chris. I hate traditional popups though – don’t you think it might alienate regular visitors?

    I’m using an email comment responder (I think it is “Thank Me Later” to try and imporve subscribers at the mo.

  20. Very interesting thanks Chris. I hate traditional popups though – don’t you think it might alienate regular visitors?

    I’m using an email comment responder (I think it is “Thank Me Later” to try and imporve subscribers at the mo.

  21. I have been using these successfully at Remarkablogger. My subscription rate tripled. As the list grows, the percentage of opens and clicks goes down, however, and I think this is probably to be expected as any list grows. My open and click rates are still very high compared to norms.

  22. I have been using these successfully at Remarkablogger. My subscription rate tripled. As the list grows, the percentage of opens and clicks goes down, however, and I think this is probably to be expected as any list grows. My open and click rates are still very high compared to norms.

  23. @Suburban Oblivion – I can’t guarantee my idea will work any better but I am going to give it my best coding and metric geek shot πŸ™‚

    @Rob – I think it is well worth taking for a test drive. My worry is around list quality rather than size (in fact as mentioned a few times here, I have done things to actually constrain my list growth to only those really interested in hearing from me).

    @Ryan – Yes I think used tactically it is a worthwhile tool.

    @Joanna – It *should* be easy to close, but clearly it wasn’t on your browser πŸ™

    @David – I think showing it for people who are leaving is a great idea, but still there is some friction with people who just hate them full stop?

    @John – I might have to upgrade to the pricier Aweber, but I am working on it πŸ™‚

    @Steve – From my stats it seems search users are the most prone to sign up, but that could be because my regular readers already are signed up or know about it – Test!

    @Bill – That kind of split testing is brilliant, thanks for sharing πŸ™‚

    @Freddie – Yes I wouldn’t show it more than once or twice at most

    @Hobo – I tried a comment emailer and got complaints about that too, but the big deal breaker was on posts where I got a lot of comments very quickly it brought the site down :O

    @Michael – It is strange how different our audiences are when on the face of it they should be quite similar. Strange! My opens and clicks stabilized pretty quickly so haven’t changed much over time, I still get emails that tank and emails that rock, size doesn’t seem to have influenced it.

  24. @Suburban Oblivion – I can’t guarantee my idea will work any better but I am going to give it my best coding and metric geek shot πŸ™‚

    @Rob – I think it is well worth taking for a test drive. My worry is around list quality rather than size (in fact as mentioned a few times here, I have done things to actually constrain my list growth to only those really interested in hearing from me).

    @Ryan – Yes I think used tactically it is a worthwhile tool.

    @Joanna – It *should* be easy to close, but clearly it wasn’t on your browser πŸ™

    @David – I think showing it for people who are leaving is a great idea, but still there is some friction with people who just hate them full stop?

    @John – I might have to upgrade to the pricier Aweber, but I am working on it πŸ™‚

    @Steve – From my stats it seems search users are the most prone to sign up, but that could be because my regular readers already are signed up or know about it – Test!

    @Bill – That kind of split testing is brilliant, thanks for sharing πŸ™‚

    @Freddie – Yes I wouldn’t show it more than once or twice at most

    @Hobo – I tried a comment emailer and got complaints about that too, but the big deal breaker was on posts where I got a lot of comments very quickly it brought the site down :O

    @Michael – It is strange how different our audiences are when on the face of it they should be quite similar. Strange! My opens and clicks stabilized pretty quickly so haven’t changed much over time, I still get emails that tank and emails that rock, size doesn’t seem to have influenced it.

  25. I have been blogging about AWeber and doing some work with them. I am really riding the fence. I have linked your blog information in my latest blog. I will admit though that a pop-up box will quickly make me close the page. I always find them intrusive. Thanks for your insight.

  26. I have been blogging about AWeber and doing some work with them. I am really riding the fence. I have linked your blog information in my latest blog. I will admit though that a pop-up box will quickly make me close the page. I always find them intrusive. Thanks for your insight.

  27. “Subscribe” or “survey” popups that appear on page load are in unbelievably bad taste. Even if they “worked” to convert subscribers you still shouldn’t use them out of respect for your audience.

    Oh, and don’t try to use warn people with a javascript alert() as they try to leave either.

  28. “Subscribe” or “survey” popups that appear on page load are in unbelievably bad taste. Even if they “worked” to convert subscribers you still shouldn’t use them out of respect for your audience.

    Oh, and don’t try to use warn people with a javascript alert() as they try to leave either.

  29. I current have four areas for signing up.
    1. Popup via aweber – one time only per user.
    2. The standard small sign up block in my menu area…with also a link for “more reasons to join.”
    3. The “More reasons to join page.”
    4. The footer of all my pages.

    When people *do* go to the “more reasons” page, I see a 56% conversion. After that, it’s the popup and then the footer which perform at 10% and 2%.

    I’ve just changed my popup text from a personal letter to a short bullet point list of reasons to join. It seems less intrusive as they no longer see my mug in the popup window. it’s also a smaller window. I’ll see what that new design converts at.

    My goal is to reach a certain critical mass. Once I reach that, and have a good number of incoming links and name recognition, I think I’ll pull the popups. I’m not sure yet.

    I have noticed with the popups a higher number of unverified subscribers. I do point them to a page, after first subscribing, that tells them to check their email for a verification link. The question I have is why are they not verifying? Is it second thoughts? I’d love to see some studies on why that happens.

  30. I current have four areas for signing up.
    1. Popup via aweber – one time only per user.
    2. The standard small sign up block in my menu area…with also a link for “more reasons to join.”
    3. The “More reasons to join page.”
    4. The footer of all my pages.

    When people *do* go to the “more reasons” page, I see a 56% conversion. After that, it’s the popup and then the footer which perform at 10% and 2%.

    I’ve just changed my popup text from a personal letter to a short bullet point list of reasons to join. It seems less intrusive as they no longer see my mug in the popup window. it’s also a smaller window. I’ll see what that new design converts at.

    My goal is to reach a certain critical mass. Once I reach that, and have a good number of incoming links and name recognition, I think I’ll pull the popups. I’m not sure yet.

    I have noticed with the popups a higher number of unverified subscribers. I do point them to a page, after first subscribing, that tells them to check their email for a verification link. The question I have is why are they not verifying? Is it second thoughts? I’d love to see some studies on why that happens.

  31. I have been a subscriber for awhile and I have to tell you that the pop-ups are annoying. You have good content most of the time. Don’t spoil it.

  32. I have been a subscriber for awhile and I have to tell you that the pop-ups are annoying. You have good content most of the time. Don’t spoil it.

  33. I guess these lightboxes by AWeber are the new black. I’ve seen them popping up (pun intended) all over our niche. It’s interesting to finally see some numbers that shed light (pun again intended) on their effectiveness.

    Thanks for the data and perspective, Chris!

  34. I guess these lightboxes by AWeber are the new black. I’ve seen them popping up (pun intended) all over our niche. It’s interesting to finally see some numbers that shed light (pun again intended) on their effectiveness.

    Thanks for the data and perspective, Chris!

  35. I’ll be interested to see the segmented analysis.

    The only reason I kept reading your blog is because I was already subscribed. If I go to a new blog and am hit with a pop-up I don’t go back.

  36. I’ll be interested to see the segmented analysis.

    The only reason I kept reading your blog is because I was already subscribed. If I go to a new blog and am hit with a pop-up I don’t go back.

  37. @Michael Martine: what would you call high open and click rates?

    @chris: what i found most annoying was that I was getting these popups while coming from my rss reader… I would probably opt for only having these popups come up for search visitors, or maybe even go a step further:

    show it only to people who have, in that browsing session, seen one or two other pages or posts on your site.

    I might try that on yoast.com πŸ™‚

  38. @Michael Martine: what would you call high open and click rates?

    @chris: what i found most annoying was that I was getting these popups while coming from my rss reader… I would probably opt for only having these popups come up for search visitors, or maybe even go a step further:

    show it only to people who have, in that browsing session, seen one or two other pages or posts on your site.

    I might try that on yoast.com πŸ™‚

  39. I have done pretty well without a pop-up on my blog, but I need more subscribers so perhaps I should give it a try.

  40. I have done pretty well without a pop-up on my blog, but I need more subscribers so perhaps I should give it a try.

  41. @Joost – Roughly: opens from 60% – 80% and clicks from 40% – 60%.

  42. @Joost – Roughly: opens from 60% – 80% and clicks from 40% – 60%.

  43. I’m sorry Chris, I really think the pop-up here is spammy. I have linked to you alot on the past and honestly cannot link to you in good conscience anymore knowing my readers will get a pop-up.

    Your content is good enough to encourage people to subscribe and come back on their own. I don’t know why you and Darren are encouraging bloggers to do this, but really it’s not a good idea (imo). I’m a subscriber to all your stuff already, you’re just making life annoying for me.

    Thanks – I’m still a fan but I think you’re not headed in the right direction here.

    Adam

  44. I’m sorry Chris, I really think the pop-up here is spammy. I have linked to you alot on the past and honestly cannot link to you in good conscience anymore knowing my readers will get a pop-up.

    Your content is good enough to encourage people to subscribe and come back on their own. I don’t know why you and Darren are encouraging bloggers to do this, but really it’s not a good idea (imo). I’m a subscriber to all your stuff already, you’re just making life annoying for me.

    Thanks – I’m still a fan but I think you’re not headed in the right direction here.

    Adam

  45. edit: i noticed this is just a test here – n/m =)

  46. edit: i noticed this is just a test here – n/m =)

  47. I know it’s a cliché, but the numbers don’t lie, and they also don’t care about anyone else’s opinion about what people should or should not be doing.

  48. I know it’s a cliché, but the numbers don’t lie, and they also don’t care about anyone else’s opinion about what people should or should not be doing.

  49. Dear Michael,

    The numbers don’t care, but some of us do.

    There are also other numbers (the numbers of people annoyed, which some of us care about, and numbers that may not be in yet – long term costs and benefits).

  50. Dear Michael,

    The numbers don’t care, but some of us do.

    There are also other numbers (the numbers of people annoyed, which some of us care about, and numbers that may not be in yet – long term costs and benefits).

  51. @Michael – true, but have a read through the comments here: http://www.dailyblogtips.com/64-of-people-wont-stop-visiting-your-site-because-of-a-pop-up/

    do you really want to upset that many people? i think for a marketing-type blog especially you have to be careful about using pop-ups. many of us immediately associate that with a spam site. i’m not interested in the number of people who sign up, im interested in the number of people i upset who never return again.

    its a good topic, im not saying you cant do it, i just wouldnt do it on one of my blogs…

  52. @Michael – true, but have a read through the comments here: http://www.dailyblogtips.com/64-of-people-wont-stop-visiting-your-site-because-of-a-pop-up/

    do you really want to upset that many people? i think for a marketing-type blog especially you have to be careful about using pop-ups. many of us immediately associate that with a spam site. i’m not interested in the number of people who sign up, im interested in the number of people i upset who never return again.

    its a good topic, im not saying you cant do it, i just wouldnt do it on one of my blogs…

  53. This is a very interesting post, thank you Chris.

    Although I also do not enjoy the pop-ups, there does seem to be a small population that obviously is positively affected by them.

    This seems to be a funny paradox…..just like with obtrusive adsense ads, although most people hate them, it seems that the more obtrusive they are, the higher the conversion rate.

    We can be tempted to follow our intincts with this, and yet, like Michael put it, the numbers do not lie. In the end…its all just numbers, right? I hate to say this, but what good does credibility do without numbers backing it?

  54. This is a very interesting post, thank you Chris.

    Although I also do not enjoy the pop-ups, there does seem to be a small population that obviously is positively affected by them.

    This seems to be a funny paradox…..just like with obtrusive adsense ads, although most people hate them, it seems that the more obtrusive they are, the higher the conversion rate.

    We can be tempted to follow our intincts with this, and yet, like Michael put it, the numbers do not lie. In the end…its all just numbers, right? I hate to say this, but what good does credibility do without numbers backing it?

  55. Hi Chris,

    Something has been bugging me about this since I first read the post days ago. As Michael Martine says: the numbers don’t lie.

    But then I realized, what are the numbers really telling us?

    If your end goal is solely to get newsletter subscribers, then this is a great tactic. Who cares who you piss off, because ultimately if they don’t sign up, they don’t matter anyway. You’ve just qualified your own leads.

    However things like blogs have a greater purpose in mind. As Michael pointed out, his open and click rates have declined using a list populated (at least in part) by pop-up subscribers. I don’t find this surprising: people who subscribe on impulse (i.e. those handed the option of subscribing vs. those who enjoy the content and actively seek out to sign up) are also the people most likely to ignore on impulse. His numbers tend to bear this out, though there might be other variables at work like a natural flattening of interest over time, etc.

    Here’s another theory: could the small rise in email subscriptions be attributed to less tech-savvy readers believing that they must subscribe in order to continue to the content they are trying to access?

    The two issues I have here then are (1) the quality of the list seems to go down as you try to capture “impulse buyers”, and (2) this campaign might have negative effects on other aspects of your operations (for example, the possibility some people might not come back due to pop-ups).

    Neither of these two issues are measured here. But what is empirically true is that most people find pop-ups annoying. Yes, people may say one thing and do another, but I think in light of this you need to be sure of what you are doing before you do it. In other words, you need to be sure that pop-ups will get the results you are looking for without taking away from results elsewhere.

    I think that marketers need to review their end goals before deciding pop-ups will work for them. If a bigger list of lower quality leads is all you are looking for, pop-ups seems to be the ticket. But if it is part of a bigger plan, make sure the small gains here don’t negatively impact you in other places of your operations.

    IMHO,

    ~Graham

  56. Hi Chris,

    Something has been bugging me about this since I first read the post days ago. As Michael Martine says: the numbers don’t lie.

    But then I realized, what are the numbers really telling us?

    If your end goal is solely to get newsletter subscribers, then this is a great tactic. Who cares who you piss off, because ultimately if they don’t sign up, they don’t matter anyway. You’ve just qualified your own leads.

    However things like blogs have a greater purpose in mind. As Michael pointed out, his open and click rates have declined using a list populated (at least in part) by pop-up subscribers. I don’t find this surprising: people who subscribe on impulse (i.e. those handed the option of subscribing vs. those who enjoy the content and actively seek out to sign up) are also the people most likely to ignore on impulse. His numbers tend to bear this out, though there might be other variables at work like a natural flattening of interest over time, etc.

    Here’s another theory: could the small rise in email subscriptions be attributed to less tech-savvy readers believing that they must subscribe in order to continue to the content they are trying to access?

    The two issues I have here then are (1) the quality of the list seems to go down as you try to capture “impulse buyers”, and (2) this campaign might have negative effects on other aspects of your operations (for example, the possibility some people might not come back due to pop-ups).

    Neither of these two issues are measured here. But what is empirically true is that most people find pop-ups annoying. Yes, people may say one thing and do another, but I think in light of this you need to be sure of what you are doing before you do it. In other words, you need to be sure that pop-ups will get the results you are looking for without taking away from results elsewhere.

    I think that marketers need to review their end goals before deciding pop-ups will work for them. If a bigger list of lower quality leads is all you are looking for, pop-ups seems to be the ticket. But if it is part of a bigger plan, make sure the small gains here don’t negatively impact you in other places of your operations.

    IMHO,

    ~Graham

  57. @Graham – That is a brilliant look at the big picture! To be clear, I said that the response rate has gone down as the list has grown, but I didn’t say that the declining response rate is attributable to the method of subscriber acquisition.

    I understand you’re suggesting it may be, and I think you might be right. The way to find out, of course, is to test some more! πŸ™‚ By stopping the pop-overs and then keeping an eye on the percentages, I’ll be able to see what my long-term tactic ought to be. If the open and click percentages grow again, even though the list itself grows more slowly, that would clearly point to abandoning pop-overs as an acquisition tactic.

  58. @Graham – That is a brilliant look at the big picture! To be clear, I said that the response rate has gone down as the list has grown, but I didn’t say that the declining response rate is attributable to the method of subscriber acquisition.

    I understand you’re suggesting it may be, and I think you might be right. The way to find out, of course, is to test some more! πŸ™‚ By stopping the pop-overs and then keeping an eye on the percentages, I’ll be able to see what my long-term tactic ought to be. If the open and click percentages grow again, even though the list itself grows more slowly, that would clearly point to abandoning pop-overs as an acquisition tactic.

  59. Hi Michael,

    Didn’t mean to misrepresent you there — I guess I misread what you had said.

    Wish I had the patience (and the traffic!) to do this level of split testing in my own work. I get bored just rewriting Google Ads, never mind programming pop-ups… lol. I’d be interested in finding out the long-term results though, if anyone out there does have the patience!

    ~Graham

  60. Hi Michael,

    Didn’t mean to misrepresent you there — I guess I misread what you had said.

    Wish I had the patience (and the traffic!) to do this level of split testing in my own work. I get bored just rewriting Google Ads, never mind programming pop-ups… lol. I’d be interested in finding out the long-term results though, if anyone out there does have the patience!

    ~Graham

  61. I am glad you took the lightbox off. It is way to close to being a pop-up and I for one usually instantly devalue a blog when I see one of these. And then a bunch of bloggers started using the lightbox to get subscribers. I thought the world had gone mad or at least that I had no clue any more. I mean, if popups work again without making subscribers angry, then I must be totally off. But it’s good to see that you removed it.

  62. I am glad you took the lightbox off. It is way to close to being a pop-up and I for one usually instantly devalue a blog when I see one of these. And then a bunch of bloggers started using the lightbox to get subscribers. I thought the world had gone mad or at least that I had no clue any more. I mean, if popups work again without making subscribers angry, then I must be totally off. But it’s good to see that you removed it.

  63. I also did a test similar to this, and I got about the same conversion rate, which I thought was really good. The only problem was that I find popups to be annoying myself, and now I was doing to my visitors the same as I find annoying.

    And I also received several complaints from my regular visitors, that’s really the reason I removed it. Even though I had it to turn up only 3 times on each visitor (using cookies), that was way too many times for many people.

    I guess I am thinking like you on this matter. I want my visitors to subscribe because they like the content, not because of some freebie.

    – jens –

  64. I also did a test similar to this, and I got about the same conversion rate, which I thought was really good. The only problem was that I find popups to be annoying myself, and now I was doing to my visitors the same as I find annoying.

    And I also received several complaints from my regular visitors, that’s really the reason I removed it. Even though I had it to turn up only 3 times on each visitor (using cookies), that was way too many times for many people.

    I guess I am thinking like you on this matter. I want my visitors to subscribe because they like the content, not because of some freebie.

    – jens –